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Question of the Month: How is fuel economy determined and reported for alternative fuel vehicles?

December 22, 2016 by Clean Cities

Last month we learned about how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determines and reports conventional light-duty vehicle fuel economy ratings. While alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) fuel economy testing is largely similar to that of conventional fuels, the EPA makes some adjustments to account for different vehicle technology and fuel energy content. By tailoring AFV fuel economy testing and reporting, the EPA is able to provide apples-to-apples comparisons and allow consumers to make informed decisions.

PHEV_FE_label

All-Electric Vehicles

What’s Reported: The fuel economy label for all-electric vehicles (EVs) includes all of the same information as that listed for gasoline vehicles (fuel economy, fuel cost savings, annual fuel cost, and emissions). However, EV labels list fuel economy using miles per gallon of gasoline-equivalent (MPGe), sometimes referred to as miles per gasoline gallon equivalent (MPGGE). MPGe represents the number of miles a vehicle can go using a quantity of fuel with the same energy content as a gallon of gasoline. MPGe is a useful way to compare gasoline vehicles with vehicles that use fuel not dispensed in gallons. EV labels also include the following information:

  • Vehicle Charge Time: Indicates how long it takes to charge a fully discharged battery using Level 2, 240-volt electric vehicle supply equipment.
  • Driving Range: Estimates the approximate number of miles that a vehicle can travel in combined city and highway driving before the battery must be recharged.
  • Fuel Consumption Rate: Shows how many kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity an EV would use to travel 100 miles. Like gallons per 100 miles, the kWh per 100 miles relates directly to the amount of fuel used. It is an estimated rate of consumption rather than economy (measured in miles per gallon [MPG] or MPGe), which allows for more accurate energy usage comparisons between vehicles.

What’s Tested: To test EV fuel economy, the vehicle battery is fully charged and the vehicle is parked overnight. The next day, the vehicle is tested over successive city cycles until the battery is depleted. The battery is then recharged and the energy consumption of the vehicle is determined by dividing the kWh of energy needed to recharge the battery by the miles traveled by the vehicle. MPGe is based on this figure. The process is repeated for highway driving cycles, and the combined city and highway fuel consumption and MPGe is based on the standard ratio of 55% city and 45% highway driving.

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

What’s Reported: Like EVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) fuel economy labels include fuel cost savings, annual fuel cost, and emissions information. For PHEVs that can use either electricity or gasoline (but only one fuel at a time), also known as non-blended or series PHEVs, labels include information for the fuel economy of both fuel modes. The electricity information is identical to that of EVs, listing charge time, fuel economy in MPGe, and fuel consumption rate in kWh per 100 miles. The gasoline information provides fuel economy in MPG and fuel consumption information in gallons per 100 miles. PHEV fuel economy labels also include electricity only, gasoline only, and combined electricity and gasoline driving range estimates. For PHEVs that use electricity and gasoline at the same time, also known as blended or parallel PHEVs, fuel economy labels reflect the fuel economy, fuel consumption, and range of the vehicle when it uses its standard electricity and gasoline mix.

What’s Tested: Because series PHEVs can use either electricity or gasoline, the EPA determines a vehicle’s fuel economy and fuel consumption based both on its use of only electricity and only gasoline. To determine a PHEV’s electric fuel economy, the EPA issues testing methodology nearly identical to that of EVs. If the gasoline engine is required to complete the test cycle, the EPA methodology uses both the electric energy consumption and the gasoline consumption to calculate the MPGe values for the electric operation only. Vehicle testing for the gasoline operation of the vehicle is similar to any other conventional hybrid electric vehicle. Parallel PHEVs are tested using their standard mix of electricity and gasoline.

Other Alternative Fuels

What’s Reported: The EPA also requires fuel economy information for original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles that use alternative fuels. This includes dedicated natural gas, propane, and hydrogen vehicles, as well as bi-fuel vehicles, such as bi-fuel natural gas, propane, and flexible fuel vehicles (vehicles that may use 51%-83% ethanol-gasoline blends). Note that the EPA does not require fuel economy testing of vehicles converted to run alternative fuels after they are purchased. While the EPA does not list fuel economy information for vehicles that use biodiesel, all diesel vehicles may use fuel blends of up to 5% biodiesel. These vehicles achieve fuel economy very similar to conventional diesel.

For vehicles that use exclusively alternative fuels (e.g., natural gas or hydrogen), the EPA lists fuel economy in MPGe in order to accurately reflect the fuel’s energy content and make easy comparisons with conventional fuel vehicles. Vehicles that can use either alternative fuels or conventional fuel, such as bi-fuel natural gas, bi-fuel propane, and flexible fuel vehicles, have fuel economy, fuel consumption, and range estimates for both the alternative and conventional fuel listed on their fuel economy labels. Fuel economy for alternative fuel use in bi-fuel and flexible fuel vehicles is listed in MPGe, while fuel economy for conventional fuel use is listed in MPG.

What’s Tested: For vehicles that run exclusively on alternative fuels, fuel economy testing methods are similar to those of conventional vehicles. For bi-fuel and flexible fuel vehicles, the vehicle fuel economy is tested as it runs exclusively on each fuel, similar to PHEVs.

For more information about AFV fuel economy, see the FuelEconomy.gov website (http://www.fueleconomy.gov/) and select from the Advanced Cars & Fuels menu. Also, view the Fuel Economy Toolkit (http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/toolkit.shtml).

Happy Holidays!

 

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team
technicalresponse@icf.com
800-254-6735

New and Improved! AFLEET Tool 2016

May 31, 2016 by Clean Cities

What is the AFLEET Tool, how can I use it to make decisions about alternative fuels, and what are the recent improvements?

Argonne National Laboratory’s Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Environment and Economic Transportation (AFLEET) Tool allows you to examine both the environmental and economic costs and benefits of alternative fuel and advanced vehicles. By entering data about your light- or heavy-duty vehicle(s), you can estimate petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollutant emissions, and cost of ownership.

AFLEET uses data from Argonne’s Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES) model to estimate life cycle (well-to-wheel) GHG and tailpipe air pollutant emissions. Users can either use the model’s default values or get even more accurate results by customizing the tool with their real life vehicle or fleet data. By using AFLEET’s simple input mechanism, users can answer questions such as:

  • What are the emissions savings of replacing a conventionally fueled fleet with alternative fuel vehicles?
  • What is the incremental cost, and potential return on investment, of buying a flexible fuel vehicle?
  • How many passenger vehicles will be “taken off the road” by using natural gas refuse trucks?

Fleets and others that have been using AFLEET since its original release in 2013 will be pleased to hear that AFLEET has been updated to reflect more recent emissions data. In addition, Argonne added new features to help users formulate a more complete picture of the costs and benefits of alternative fuels.

Updates include:

  • Fuel Prices: AFLEET uses public and private station pricing based on the 2015 average Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report data. In addition, fuel pricing is now state-based rather than based on a national average. Users may also input a range of fuel prices to determine effects on simple payback models.
  • Infrastructure Costs: The updated version of AFLEET features data on fueling station and electric vehicle supply equipment infrastructure construction, operation, and maintenance costs. Users may also calculate other infrastructure-related costs, such as public station out-of-route mileage and fueling labor costs.
  • Latest Vehicle and Emission Data: AFLEET uses the latest GREET 2015 air pollutant emissions data, which includes updated heavy-duty fuel economy and emissions data, data for fuel cell electric vehicles, and updated life cycle data for renewable natural gas. AFLEET has also been updated to use the most recent version of EPA’s MOVES data, 2014a.
  • Externality Costs: AFLEET output data now includes externality costs of national petroleum use and GHG emissions. Externality costs are the indirect damages associated with fuels that are not explicitly captured by the marketplace (e.g., property damages from increased flood risk as a result of climate change). Externality cost estimates will be useful in putting local vehicle and fleet decisions in a national perspective.

For information about and instructions for using AFLEET, refer to Argonne’s AFLEET User Guide.

In addition, check out the Alternative Fuels Data Center’s (AFDC) fuel-specific emissions pages for general information on the emissions impacts of the various alternative fuels:

For more information, contact:

 

 

EV Summit Recap

November 9, 2015 by Clean Cities

We promised you a full recap of the 2015 EV Transportation and Technology Summit, and here it is!  Held at our Florida Solar Energy Center campus in Cocoa, FL from Oct. 20-22, the event was organized by the Electric Vehicle Transportation Center of the University of Central Florida.  The Summit engaged attendees from across the country on the future of Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) and how their expanding adoption effects city, road, and development planning as well as assists in advancing technology, economics, and the environment.

The Summit kicked off with a pre-event PEV Market and Technology Workshop to discuss current trends and opportunities in PEV adoption.  After, Summit attendees were invited on a Kennedy Space Center Tour followed by the opening reception at the Cocoa Beach Courtyard Marriott.

To take a look at the Pre-Summit Workshop Materials, go to http://evtc.fsec.ucf.edu/education/short_course/EV-Workshop.html.

Day 2 began with a focus on PEV Technology, Infrastructure, Product Development, and Resources, featuring presentations on PEV technology and standards, PEV charging technology and the grid, product and market offerings, and vehicle adoption programs and resources.  Trev Hall, Clean Cities Southeast Regional Manager, provided an overview of US Department of Energy Vehicle Technology Office Resources made available through the Alternative Fuels Data Center website.  The day concluded with a PEV Vehicle Display in the Florida Solar Energy Center parking lot nearest the public PEV charging stations.

Finally, Day 3 of the EV Summit featured presentations pertaining to Planning, Policy, and the Future of PEVs.  Linda Bluestein, Co-Director for National Clean Cities, delivered a talk on PEV Public and Policy Awareness as it influences electric vehicle adoption.  Other presentations that followed included an assessment of the current state of the EV, a few discussions of future infrastructure and transportation planning goals, and a concluding panel of Florida electric utilities’ perspectives on PEV advancement.

Please visit the 2015 EV Summit website to take a look at this year’s presentations, presenters, and a full agenda at http://www.evsummit.org/schedule.php.

We thank the Electric Vehicle Transportation Center for organizing the Summit and for allowing Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition to participate in this new and educational event.  Hopefully, we’ll be seeing another wonderful EV Summit in 2016!

Other recent and upcoming events include:

On Thursday, Nov. 5, Central Florida Clean Cities welcomed its newest sponsor and member, Protec Fuels, as they sponsored a luncheon and workshop on Green Fleet Solutions. Speakers included Orlando City Commissioner and Mayor Pro Tem Jim Gray, Robert White of the Renewable Fuels Association, Bruce Chesson of NASA/KSC Transportation and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Programs, 100 Best Fleets’ Tom Johnson, David L. Dunn from City of Orlando Fleet and Facilities Management, and Protec Fuel’s Andrew Greenberg to discuss the benefits of adding E85 Flex Fuel to your fleet..

Finally, the Third Annual Emerald Coast Transportation Symposium will take place Nov. 12-13 at the Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort in Miramar Beach, FL.  Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Coordinator Colleen Kettles will be speaking at the symposium in a panel event on renewable and alternative fuels.  Learn more and register for the event at http://www.wfrpc.org/events/transportation-symposium.

We look forward to reporting back again soon!

Photos

Co-Director for National Clean Cities, US DOE Linda Bluestein delivers a presentation on Electric Vehicle Public and Policy Awareness at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

Co-Director for National Clean Cities, US DOE Linda Bluestein delivers a presentation on Electric Vehicle Public and Policy Awareness at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, James Culp of Duke Energy describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, James Culp of Duke Energy describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, Todd Jensen of Florida Power and Light describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, Todd Jensen of Florida Power and Light describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, Bryan Coley of Gulf Power describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, Bryan Coley of Gulf Power describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, JEA’s Peter King describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, JEA’s Peter King describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, OUC’s Eva Reyes describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, OUC’s Eva Reyes describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, TECO’s Keith Gruetzmacher describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, TECO’s Keith Gruetzmacher describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Participants were able to climb inside the different vehicles to learn more about the model options and which vehicle offerings best matched their business and personal needs.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL. Participants were able to climb inside the different vehicles to learn more about the model options and which vehicle offerings best matched their business and personal needs.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Pictured here is a new 2015 VIA Motors Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV), provided by Florida Power and Light.  Many other utilities are also currently using and expanding their fleets of PEVs.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL. Pictured here is a new 2015 VIA Motors Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV), provided by Florida Power and Light. Many other utilities are also currently using and expanding their fleets of PEVs. Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Pictured are a Chevy Volt and a Nissan Leaf actively charging at the Florida Solar Energy Center public PEV charging stations.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL. Pictured are a Chevy Volt and a Nissan Leaf actively charging at the Florida Solar Energy Center public PEV charging stations. Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Pictured is a participating Tesla Model S vehicle.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL. Pictured is a participating Tesla Model S vehicle. Photo by Nick Waters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TruStar Energy Lowers Commercial Fueling Cost in Orlando by Opening Its First Public CNG Fueling Station

July 21, 2015 by Clean Cities

Company Capitalizes on Market Shift to CNG Fuel

(ORLANDO, FL) July 21, 2015 – TruStar Energy, one of the nation’s leading developers of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fueling stations, announced today that it has opened its first TruStar Energy-branded public CNG fueling station in Orlando, Florida. Located in a heavy truck traffic corridor, the 24/7 CNG fast-fill station is capable of fueling several hundred vehicles a day and promises to deliver lower fueling cost and reduced transportation-related emissions to the
Orlando area.

“We continue to see a shift taking place in North America where more commercial vehicles are running on CNG—it’s cheaper, cleaner, quieter running, and domestically abundant and produced. As a result, the company has embarked on a strategic path to open dozens of TruStar Energy public CNG stations over the next several years—Orlando is our first,” said TruStar Energy President, Adam Comora. “Rest assured though, we will continue to provide the same outstanding design, construction, maintenance, and training services for private, public and government customers.”

From left to right:: Florida State Representative Victor Torres, Trustar President Adam Comora, US Congressman Daniel Webster, and TECO representative Keith Gruetzmacher. Backdrop is the City of Orlando CNG Refuse Truck.

From left to right:: Florida State Representative Victor Torres, Trustar President Adam Comora, US Congressman Daniel Webster, and TECO representative Keith Gruetzmacher. Backdrop is the City of Orlando CNG Refuse Truck.

“We identified Orlando as one of the best markets to build our first station, because it has a high volume of CNG vehicles and the potential to add many more,” remarked Scott Edelbach, General Manager of TruStar Energy. “Our state-of-the-art CNG station is perfectly located close to several major fleets as well as a heavy traffic corridor, making it a valuable, profitable and productive resource for businesses in the area.”

The new TruStar Energy CNG station at 8520 Exchange Drive, in the Orlando Central Park development, has four traffic lanes and two fueling islands, providing easy access for commercial vehicles and private CNG-powered consumer vehicles. Designed for future expansion, the station can accept two additional dispensers adding four more traffic lanes. The station is supplied by TECO Peoples Gas and accepts commercial fuel cards such as Comdata or Fuelman as well as all major credit cards.

“TruStar Energy’s team of experts were valuable partners in the construction of our Tampa and Ft. Meyers CNG fueling stations—those stations were built on time, on budget and there were no surprises,” said Jose Rivera, Vice President at J.J. Taylor, a Florida-based beer distributor. “The company’s investment in growing Florida’s CNG fueling infrastructure will provide fleets—like ours—the ability to extend our routes outside of our private station network—they should be applauded for undertaking this initiative.”

Fleets that run on CNG have lower exhaust and carbon emissions compared to diesel and gasoline. The average refuse truck uses 10,000 gallons of fuel each year, which is the carbon equivalent of burning 272 barrels of oil. By switching to natural gas, the carbon equivalent is cut to two barrels. Plus, natural gas engines have an average of 80 percent to 90 percent lower decibel level than diesel engines, and CNG is up to 50 percent less expensive than gasoline or diesel. CNG is also insulated from price volatility due to international conflicts and events, which in recent years has been responsible for dramatic price fluctuations for gasoline and diesel.

“By using domestically produced natural gas to fuel our transportation needs, we are not only creating and securing more American jobs, but also decreasing our dependence on foreign oil,” said Keith Gruetzmacher, Senior Manager of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Programs for TECO Peoples Gas. “TECO Peoples Gas is proud to partner with TruStar Energy to accelerate this clean, efficient and American fueling solution.”

To learn more about TruStar Energy’s CNG fueling station program, visit www.trustarenergy.com.

About TruStar Energy

TruStar Energy, a subsidiary of Fortistar, is the fastest growing compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station owner, constructor and service provider in North America. With decades of experience in trucking and fueling, the company’s professionals are experts at designing and building CNG fueling stations that are ready on time, on budget and are swiftly profitable for their owners. And with a rapidly growing network of public stations and 24/7 service and support, we’re always there when you need us.

TruStar Energy puts fleet owners in the driver’s seat by offering best-in-class, realistic and affordable options to meet a full range of fueling needs. For additional information, please visit www.trustarenergy.com and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

TruStar Energy: True Partnership. For a Change.
###
TruStar Energy Media Contact:
Andy Beck
Makovsky
abeck@makovsky.com
202-587-5634

 

E15 Fuel Now Available in Orlando Area

June 1, 2015 by Clean Cities

Kissimmee Citgo, Protec Fuel, Expand E15 Availability in Fla.

KISSIMMEE, Fla.–May 20, 2015 –Offering the first E15 in the greater Orlando area, Kissimmee Citgo, assisted by Protec Fuel, has launched the 88-octane E15 ethanol blend fuel. E15 can run in any 2001 and newer gasoline engine and costs less than regular gas. The station also sells E85 fuel and B20 biodiesel fuel, which makes it important in the growth of emissions-reducing, renewable fuels.

This location is the first in the Greater Orlando area and is located at:
Kissimmee Citgo
3297 S. John Young Pkwy,
Kissimmee, FL 34746.

“We are extremely excited to be the first in Central Florida to offer this additional grade of ethanol fuel,” said Ken Allen, president of Mid-State Energy, Inc., “and offer our customers more choices as it comes to fueling. This tourist destination area is especially prime with all the rental cars that can run on E15, and even E85.” Mid-State Energy, Inc., www.midstateenergy.com, owns, and provides fuel at, this station.

These are part of Protec Fuel’s station rollout of dozens of E15 sites to metropolitan areas that include various cities in the South and Southeast. This is the fourth location under Protec to open in Florida.

Ethanol“The growth of alternative fuel vehicles and the infrastructure required to support their expansion is flourishing in Central Florida,” said Colleen Kettles, Central Fla. Clean Cities Coalition Coordinator. “The CFCCC is proud to partner with Protec Fuel as they introduce this ethanol fuel blend to our region. This option provides our public and private fleets, as well as the general public, with yet another option to reduce the use of petroleum to power their vehicles,” she said.

Protec Fuel, based in Boca Raton, Fla., has partnered to help manage the ethanol blends installation and provide fuel for the locations’ new cleaner-burning fuels. “I’d like to thank Citgo and Protec’s longtime partner Mid-State Energy for giving choices at retail stations,” said Todd Garner, CEO of Protec Fuel. “These choices fuel the spirit of the American driver, with freedom to choose a fuel that meets their needs – such as environmental benefits, or helping the U.S. become more energy independent.”

The fuel pumps are open 6 am – 12 am, and the location can be reached at 407- 932-4443. Currently, and typically, both E15 and E85 are selling for less than regular gasoline. A grand opening celebration will be held at the start of summer.

E15, a blend of 15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gasoline, is the most widely tested fuel ever sold to consumers. The ethanol portion of these fuels is 100% U.S.-made and supports jobs and keeps our money in local communities. Ethanol burns cleaner and cooler in engines, which helps the performance level of the vehicle. It also can extend the life of the engine. Since E15 can run in any 2001 or newer gasoline engine, that equates to 80% of vehicles in the U.S.

E85 is an alternative fuel blend that can be used in over 18.5 million vehicles across the U.S. E85 is a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline that can be used in flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs). There are over 100 FFV models on the market today that can run on E85. Visit www.flexfinder.org to see if you have an FFV.

Click here for further E85 station locations (http://www.afdc.energy.gov/locator/stations). This alternative has been proven to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reduce the nation’s dependency on foreign petroleum.

About Protec Fuel: Protec Fuel is a fuel distribution and management company based in Boca Raton, Fla., specializing in turnkey ethanol programs for retailers, fleets and fuel distributors throughout the U.S. Its comprehensive approach includes ethanol supply; financial risk management programs; site selection and pump installation; and RINS management. Protec supplies fuel for, either directly or through distribution partners, or conducts installation for over 200 E85 stations. www.protecfuel.com

CONTACT: Amber Thurlo Pearson
(512) 686-8532
amber@protecfuel.com

About Clean Cities Coalitions: Clean Cities coalitions throughout the nation are charged with reducing the nation’s petroleum usage by the U.S. DOE. See more at http://centralfloridacleancities.com.

Clean Energy Opens Newest Public Natural Gas Station in Orlando

April 20, 2015 by Clean Cities

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. (March 12, 2015) — Clean Energy Fuels Corp. (NASDAQ: CLNE) today announced the opening of its newest natural gas fueling station, located at 6155 Cargo Road, Orlando, FL. The new station at Orlando International Airport is open to the public 24/7 and can accommodate a variety of natural gas vehicles ranging in size from passenger cars and airport support vehicles to heavy-duty trucks.

“With over 57 million tourists annually, Orlando is one of the most important tourist destinations in the United States. There is a tremendous opportunity to utilize natural gas in transportation to cut emissions, improving air quality throughout the region,” said Mark Riley, vice president, Clean Energy Fuels.

The compressed natural gas fueling (CNG) station, under a 20-year lease agreement with the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority, accepts all major credit cards and fleet carts. The station joins Clean Energy’s public-access CNG station located at Tampa International Airport in offering natural gas fuel to area fleets looking to reduce their fueling expense and greenhouse gas emissions.

OIA Station Opening - Clean Energy Orlando2“Orlando International Airport is committed to pursuing and promoting green initiatives that reinforce our reputation as a conscientious community partner,” said Phil Brown, executive director of the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority. “This station is an important component of our sustainability effort and is an environmentally responsible way to ensure the natural beauty of Central Florida is protected for future generations.”

The opening of this public natural gas fueling station in Orlando will make it even easier for local and regional fleets to make the switch to cleaner and more cost-effective natural gas fuel.

Natural gas fuel costs up to $1.00 less per gallon than gasoline or diesel, depending on local market conditions. The use of natural gas fuel not only reduces operating costs for vehicles, but also reduces greenhouse gas emissions up to 30% in light-duty vehicles and 23% in medium to heavy-duty vehicles. In addition, nearly all natural gas consumed in North America is produced domestically.

Clean Energy Media Contact:
Patric Rayburn
949-437-1411
patric.rayburn@cleanenergyfuels.com

Clean Energy Investor Contact:
Tony Kritzer
949-437-1403
tkritzer@cleanenergyfuels.com

TPO and JEA debut public access electric car charging stations

February 24, 2015 by Clean Cities

Jacksonville is about to get a charge, with the public debut of Chargewell, a partnership between the North Florida Transportation Planning Organization and JEA that will distribute electric vehicle charging stations throughout the city.

The program was announced at the Florida Alternative Fuel Vehicles Expo, where the TPO, JEA, Champion Brands and ThyssenKrupp Elevator discussed with the public their alternative fuel efforts.

The big announcement was the reveal of about 30 EV charging stations that would be established at businesses throughout the area to provide electric car owners a place to charge when they are away from home or visiting Jacksonville. The hope is a “build it and users will come” model.

“More charging stations will get people more comfortable about buying electric vehicles,” said Marci Larson, spokeswoman for the TPO. JEA is the first utility to partner in the Chargewell regional partnership, Larson said, and the TPO will continue to partner with other regional utilities through the program.

“Research shows,” said Peter King, customer solutions program manager for JEA, “that public charging infrastructure is a key piece of getting people to switch to electric cars.” (Click through the gallery to see some of the vehicles on display.)

The TPO is investing $300,000 — which comes from federal funding — into the project and JEA will install the stations at the selected businesses.

Businesses can now apply to host one of the stations. Applicants must be in a high-traveled area with public access and a JEA customer. A team will evaluate the applications, which are due on March 31.

“These are going to be dispersed as evenly as possible so they can reduce range anxiety for drivers,” Larson said.

The businesses can decide to charge up to 18 cents per kilowatt-hour, said King, or they can give the service to customers as a promotion.

He said the initial deployment of stations will get Jacksonville close to the ideal spacing for charging stations: about seven miles between each station.

King said the new stations will be hooked up to a network where key data can be determined from the stations and usage trends can be evaluated.

So far, about 266 EV owners plug in throughout Duval County. There are about 500 users in the five-county area and 15,000 users in Florida. King said the number of users increased 45 percent from 2013 to 2014.

EV users at the expo said they pay about 4 cents per mile and a gas equivalent of $1 per gallon.

The expo was also a chance for other alternative fuels to be highlighted. Earl Benton, CEO of Champion Brands, discussed his public-access compressed natural gas station. So far, he said, he and other fleets are using the station as a fuel-up for CNG-capable tractor-trailers. Tom Armstrong, director of fleet for ThyssenKrupp Elevator, said the propane-powered vehicles his company uses are ideal when the vehicles won’t be returning to a home base every night.

The diversity of alternative fuels is what will be key to getting the community to embrace cleaner energy, said Jeff Sheffield, executive director of the TPO.

“The options need to be diverse,” he said, adding that stations like Gate were adding EV charging and CNG fueling options on top of offering gas and diesel. “What we’re trending toward are energy stations. In the end, there won’t be one clear winner, it will be a blend of all of them.”

 

by Reporter- Jacksonville Business Journal

2015 Vehicle Buyer’s Guide Available

February 20, 2015 by Clean Cities
Annual guide helps you compare and evaluate alternative fuel vehicles to make sound purchasing decisions

The Clean Cities 2015 Vehicle Buyer’s Guide is now available online and for order at no charge through the EERE Publication and Product Library. Consumers and fleet managers have relied on the annual guide for years as a comprehensive and unbiased source of information for evaluating alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) options. The 2015 version promises to meet, if not exceed, that tradition.

Today, hundreds of light-duty AFV and advanced technology vehicle models can be purchased. For example, the 2015 model year features nearly 200 AFV and hybrid electric vehicle models, including more than 80 flex-fuel vehicles. This guide provides model-specific information such as vehicle specifications, manufacturer suggested retail price, fuel economy, energy impact, and emissions. Drivers can use the information to identify options, compare vehicles, and make more informed purchase decisions.

2015buyingguideOf particular importance to fleet managers, AFVs not only reduce petroleum use and save on fuel costs but help meet federal, state, and municipal requirements for reducing carbon. In fact, there are now approximately 20 million light-duty AFVs on American roads.

For those who prefer to make vehicle evaluations and comparisons online, the Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Search tool on the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) is convenient and interactive. The database includes medium- and heavy-duty vehicles as well. For a guide specific to medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, download the Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles or order a copy through the EERE Publication and Product Library.

New AFV offerings roll out continuously, and neither the documents nor the database are absolutely inclusive. If you are aware of a new offering or model change, please alert the Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team so we can update the information.

blog post written by Kathryn Ruckman, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
For more information:
Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team
technicalresponse@icfi.com800-254-6735

 

 

 

ACF CNG Announces First Compressed Natural Gas Station in Leesburg, FL.

February 4, 2015 by Clean Cities

Leesburg, FL – ACF Compressed Natural Gas™, a business unit of Air Centers of Florida announces the opening of the first public access compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station located at 940 Thomas Avenue Leesburg, Florida. The CNG station is solely owned and operated by CNG Energy LLC.

The public access CNG station set to open in late February 2015 has easy access for light to medium-duty fleets and will serve as the primary CNG fueling station for Ross Plumbing’s service fleet. Terry Ross owner/operator said; he’s confident even with today’s $2.00 gasoline prices that he will still save about $0.50 per gallon by converting his fleet to CNG, and also ads that he feels the cost of gasoline will bounce back up soon providing a greater cost savings.

The new CNG Energy, LLC., station will be open during regular business hours Monday through Friday 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and will accept major credit cards. A single hose fast fill dispenser and two storage vessels will allow for multiple vehicles to fuel back to back, and will feature Simpkins Energy CNG compression. An official ribbon cutting ceremony and grand opening is being planned for a later date.

About ACF CNG

ACF Compressed Natural Gas is the Master Distributor for GE Gemini, Ingersoll Rand and Simpkins Energy’s complete CNG product line in the State of Florida. ACF represents these three equipment manufacturer for sales, service, and parts in the State of Florida. www.acfcng.com

For over 25 years Air Centers of Florida has served thousands of customers across the state, with 70+ employees including a team of over 30 certified service technicians providing over 400 years’ experience specializing in Air and CNG Service & Maintenance. Their technicians also service several other compressor brands such as Angi Ariel, Norwalk, Knox Western, Corken and Sauer just to mention a few. ACF currently provides service from four locations, Miami, Jacksonville, Orlando and their headquarters in Tampa.

For More Information, Contact:

Jim Hayhurst
Director of Business Development
800-423-8562
321-228-8908 (cell)
j.hayhurst@acfpower.com

 

Port Canaveral Adding EV Charging Stations

December 31, 2014 by Clean Cities
Quick Charge

Electric vehicles on display in Melbourne part of week-long international campaign.

(Photo: CRAIG BAILEY/FILE PHOTO)

Port commissioners voted 4-1 to install a fast-charging station for electric vehicles in the parking lot near the Exploration Tower in the port’s Cove area. Nissan will pay the $31,000 cost of the equipment, and Port Canaveral will pay the $18,376 for engineering, design and installation work.

Fast-charge stations can provide an electric vehicle with a full charge in less that 30 minutes, according to Carol Noble, the port’s director of environmental plans and programs.

Separately, the port plans to install slow-charging stations for electric vehicles in the Disney Cruise Line long-term parking garage, which port Chief Executive Officer John Walsh said was a suggestion of Disney officials, stemming from requests of Disney customers.

That project will cost less than $10,000 for engineering, design and equipment, Noble said.

 

Dave Berman, FLORIDA TODAY 10:15 a.m. EST December 29, 2014

 

 

 

 

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