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Summary of Alternative Fuel Tax Credit Extensions the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (H.R. 1892)

February 12, 2018 by Clean Cities

On Friday, February 9, President Trump signed the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (H.R. 1892). Division D of the Act retroactively extends many tax credits.

There are several Bipartisan Budget Act provisions with implications for Clean Cities portfolio items:

  • Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit. Section 40404 extends the tax credit for alternative fuel infrastructure through December 31, 2017. Fueling equipment for natural gas, propane, liquefied hydrogen, electricity, E85, and biodiesel are eligible for a tax credit of 30%, up to $30,000. Residential fueling equipment may receive a tax credit up to $1,000.
  • Alternative Fuel Excise Tax Credit. Section 40415 extends the $0.50 per gallon tax credit for alternative fuels, including liquefied hydrogen, through December 31, 2017.
  • Alternative Fuel Mixture Excise Tax Credit. Section 40415 also extends the $0.50 per gallon tax credit for alternative fuel used to produce a mixture containing at least 0.1% gasoline, diesel, or kerosene through December 31, 2017. Alternative fuel blenders must be registered with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The U.S. Department of the Treasury (Treasury) will issue guidance for how to submit claims for this credit by March 11, 2018.
  • Biodiesel Income Tax Credit. Section 40407 extends the biodiesel income tax credit through December 31, 2017. A taxpayer that delivers unblended biodiesel (B100) into the tank of a vehicle may be eligible for a $1.00 per gallon of biodiesel, agri-biodiesel, or renewable diesel tax credit.
  • Biodiesel Mixture Excise Tax Credit. Section 40407 also extends the $0.50 per gallon tax credit for biodiesel, agri-biodiesel, or renewable diesel used to produce a mixture containing at least 0.1% gasoline, diesel, or kerosene through December 31, 2017. Alternative fuel blenders must be registered with the IRS. Treasury will issue guidance for how to submit claims for this credit by March 11, 2018.
  • Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit. Section 40403 extends the $4,000 tax credit for the purchase of qualified light-duty fuel cell vehicles through December 31, 2017.
  • Qualified Two-Wheeled Plug-In Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Tax Credit. Section 40405 extends the two-wheeled plug-in electric drive motor vehicle tax credit through December 31, 2017. Qualified vehicles are eligible for a tax credit of 10% of the cost of the vehicle, up to $2,500.
  • Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit. Section 40406 extends the tax credit for second generation biofuel producers through December 31, 2017. Second generation biofuel producers registered with the IRS may be eligible for a $1.01 per gallon of biodiesel tax credit.
  • Second Generation Biofuel Production Property Depreciation Allowance. Section 40412 extends the 50% special depreciation allowance for second generation biofuel production plants through December 31, 2017.

The changes outlined above are effective immediately. To view the full text of the Bipartisan Budget Act, visit https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-115hr1892enr/pdf/BILLS-115hr1892enr.pdf. See the Alternative Fuels Data Center Federal Laws and Incentives page for descriptions of each incentive.

Fleets for the Future: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Procurement Best Practices

February 5, 2018 by Clean Cities

The Fleets for the Future team has put together four best practice guides to help fleets prepare to successfully deploy alternative fuel vehicles. These best practices build upon both the extensive information provided by the U.S. DOE and a number of recent successful case studies. The specific goal of these best practice guides is to educate procurement officers, fleet managers, and other interested stakeholders to plan for a large scale deployment of AFVs.

STAY TUNED: Fleets for the Future plans to highlight alternative fuel school buses and refuse haulers in early 2018. Contact us with any questions or information on your fleet needs!

  • Gaseous Fuel Vehicle Procurement Best Practices Guide
    This guide briefly summarizes the basic attributes and benefits of both gaseous-fuels and their respective vehicle technologies, then explores best applications and why, highlighting the relationship between upfront premiums, fuel use, and vehicle maintenance to total cost of ownership (TCO). The guide also provides information about fueling infrastructure options and offers planning guidance. Finally, it reviews steps that lead organizations will need to undertake to build a successful cooperative purchasing initiative.
  • Electric Vehicle Procurement Best Practices Guide
    This guide is meant to help fleets and regionally-based buying cooperatives in understanding the benefits of deploying electric vehicles (EVs), as well as EV-specific considerations involved in the procurement process. Topics below cover both battery electric vehicles (BEV), which run solely on electricity as well as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), which use batteries to power an electric motor and use another fuel, such as gasoline, diesel, or fuel cells, to power an internal combustion engine.
  • Guide to Financing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Procurement
    This document lays out the common strategies available for public and private fleets attempting to finance an investment in alternative fuel vehicles. While not all options are available to all fleets, the intent is to educate fleet managers on the best practices and challenges associated with implementation of each strategy.
  • Fleet Transition Planning for Alternative Fuel Vehicles
    This document presents general fuel-neutral guidelines on planning a coordinated bulk procurement of AFVs. It discusses stakeholder engagement efforts, goal setting, prioritization of vehicle procurements, and planning for implementation of a successful procurement.

Plug-In Perks From Drive Electric Orlando

February 5, 2018 by Clean Cities

Drive Electric Orlando is a groundbreaking partnership between Enterprise Car Rental, hotels, and tourist attractions designed to offer vacationers and business travelers an exciting and convenient opportunity to use an eco-friendly car during their next trip.

Your trip to Orlando was always going to be great. But because you rented a Chevy Volt, you also scored a Plug-In Perks Pass for a VIP experience!

For more information, please visit http://pluginperks.com/plug-in-perks/

Question of the Month: What are state and local governments doing to incentivize alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs)?

March 3, 2017 by Clean Cities

There are many notable incentive activities at the state and local levels. Many states offer incentives for alternative fuels that advance specific environmental and energy security goals, while cities provide even more localized support.

States are targeting vehicles, infrastructure, and other means to encourage AFV adoption. Below are various types of incentives, as well as hyperlinked examples of each:

  • AFV Purchase Incentives: States offer grants, rebates, and tax credits for the purchase of AFVs. While some states may focus vehicle incentives on a particular fuel type, such as electric vehicles, others are more general in their support. States provide AFV purchase incentives to consumers, commercial fleets, and public fleets, such as schools and government agencies. Different incentive mechanisms tend to be more appropriate for different categories of vehicle purchasers; for example, grants are often limited to certain types of entities. Public fleets may not be liable for taxes, so they usually benefit more from grants than from tax credits. Private fleets can benefit from grants, rebates, and tax credits.
  • Fueling Infrastructure Purchase and Installation Incentives: Similar to AFV incentives, states provide grants, rebates, and tax credits for alternative fueling infrastructure. States usually create incentives for the physical fueling infrastructure, but many programs also support installation costs. Some states also offer a tax credit or tax reduction for the production or purchase of alternative fuel itself. Fueling infrastructure incentives may stipulate that the fueling or charging station must be available to the public, which helps to increase the availability of alternative fuels to a broader range of entities.
  • Other Incentives: In addition to financial support for the purchase of AFVs, states may give special benefits to AFV drivers. For example, some states allow high-occupancy vehicle lane access to AFVs, while others provide reduced registration fees, weight restriction exemptions, and emissions inspections exemptions.

Municipalities are also playing a role in supporting AFV deployment. Cities and counties incentivize AFVs in a number of ways, including by offering free or discounted parking, expediting permitting processes, and providing vehicle and infrastructure grants. For example, New Haven, CT, provides free parking on city streets for AFVs, while Los Angeles, CA, offers instant, online residential electric vehicle supply equipment permitting approval. The Alternative Fuels Data Center’s (AFDC) Local Laws and Incentives page provides more information on these and a greater array of other local options; while the page regarding local laws and incentives is not meant to be comprehensive, it provides users an idea of the different municipal programs and policies that exist (http://www.afdc.energy.gov/laws/local_examples). If you are aware of an innovative way that municipalities are supporting alternative fuels and vehicle acquisition, please contact the Clean Cities Technical Response Service at technicalresponse@icf.com to share the details.

For more information about state and local alternative fuel incentives, see the AFDC Laws and Incentives page (http://www.afdc.energy.gov/laws).

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team
technicalresponse@icf.com
800-254-6735

Question of the Month: How is fuel economy determined and reported for alternative fuel vehicles?

December 22, 2016 by Clean Cities

Last month we learned about how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determines and reports conventional light-duty vehicle fuel economy ratings. While alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) fuel economy testing is largely similar to that of conventional fuels, the EPA makes some adjustments to account for different vehicle technology and fuel energy content. By tailoring AFV fuel economy testing and reporting, the EPA is able to provide apples-to-apples comparisons and allow consumers to make informed decisions.

PHEV_FE_label

All-Electric Vehicles

What’s Reported: The fuel economy label for all-electric vehicles (EVs) includes all of the same information as that listed for gasoline vehicles (fuel economy, fuel cost savings, annual fuel cost, and emissions). However, EV labels list fuel economy using miles per gallon of gasoline-equivalent (MPGe), sometimes referred to as miles per gasoline gallon equivalent (MPGGE). MPGe represents the number of miles a vehicle can go using a quantity of fuel with the same energy content as a gallon of gasoline. MPGe is a useful way to compare gasoline vehicles with vehicles that use fuel not dispensed in gallons. EV labels also include the following information:

  • Vehicle Charge Time: Indicates how long it takes to charge a fully discharged battery using Level 2, 240-volt electric vehicle supply equipment.
  • Driving Range: Estimates the approximate number of miles that a vehicle can travel in combined city and highway driving before the battery must be recharged.
  • Fuel Consumption Rate: Shows how many kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity an EV would use to travel 100 miles. Like gallons per 100 miles, the kWh per 100 miles relates directly to the amount of fuel used. It is an estimated rate of consumption rather than economy (measured in miles per gallon [MPG] or MPGe), which allows for more accurate energy usage comparisons between vehicles.

What’s Tested: To test EV fuel economy, the vehicle battery is fully charged and the vehicle is parked overnight. The next day, the vehicle is tested over successive city cycles until the battery is depleted. The battery is then recharged and the energy consumption of the vehicle is determined by dividing the kWh of energy needed to recharge the battery by the miles traveled by the vehicle. MPGe is based on this figure. The process is repeated for highway driving cycles, and the combined city and highway fuel consumption and MPGe is based on the standard ratio of 55% city and 45% highway driving.

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

What’s Reported: Like EVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) fuel economy labels include fuel cost savings, annual fuel cost, and emissions information. For PHEVs that can use either electricity or gasoline (but only one fuel at a time), also known as non-blended or series PHEVs, labels include information for the fuel economy of both fuel modes. The electricity information is identical to that of EVs, listing charge time, fuel economy in MPGe, and fuel consumption rate in kWh per 100 miles. The gasoline information provides fuel economy in MPG and fuel consumption information in gallons per 100 miles. PHEV fuel economy labels also include electricity only, gasoline only, and combined electricity and gasoline driving range estimates. For PHEVs that use electricity and gasoline at the same time, also known as blended or parallel PHEVs, fuel economy labels reflect the fuel economy, fuel consumption, and range of the vehicle when it uses its standard electricity and gasoline mix.

What’s Tested: Because series PHEVs can use either electricity or gasoline, the EPA determines a vehicle’s fuel economy and fuel consumption based both on its use of only electricity and only gasoline. To determine a PHEV’s electric fuel economy, the EPA issues testing methodology nearly identical to that of EVs. If the gasoline engine is required to complete the test cycle, the EPA methodology uses both the electric energy consumption and the gasoline consumption to calculate the MPGe values for the electric operation only. Vehicle testing for the gasoline operation of the vehicle is similar to any other conventional hybrid electric vehicle. Parallel PHEVs are tested using their standard mix of electricity and gasoline.

Other Alternative Fuels

What’s Reported: The EPA also requires fuel economy information for original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles that use alternative fuels. This includes dedicated natural gas, propane, and hydrogen vehicles, as well as bi-fuel vehicles, such as bi-fuel natural gas, propane, and flexible fuel vehicles (vehicles that may use 51%-83% ethanol-gasoline blends). Note that the EPA does not require fuel economy testing of vehicles converted to run alternative fuels after they are purchased. While the EPA does not list fuel economy information for vehicles that use biodiesel, all diesel vehicles may use fuel blends of up to 5% biodiesel. These vehicles achieve fuel economy very similar to conventional diesel.

For vehicles that use exclusively alternative fuels (e.g., natural gas or hydrogen), the EPA lists fuel economy in MPGe in order to accurately reflect the fuel’s energy content and make easy comparisons with conventional fuel vehicles. Vehicles that can use either alternative fuels or conventional fuel, such as bi-fuel natural gas, bi-fuel propane, and flexible fuel vehicles, have fuel economy, fuel consumption, and range estimates for both the alternative and conventional fuel listed on their fuel economy labels. Fuel economy for alternative fuel use in bi-fuel and flexible fuel vehicles is listed in MPGe, while fuel economy for conventional fuel use is listed in MPG.

What’s Tested: For vehicles that run exclusively on alternative fuels, fuel economy testing methods are similar to those of conventional vehicles. For bi-fuel and flexible fuel vehicles, the vehicle fuel economy is tested as it runs exclusively on each fuel, similar to PHEVs.

For more information about AFV fuel economy, see the FuelEconomy.gov website (http://www.fueleconomy.gov/) and select from the Advanced Cars & Fuels menu. Also, view the Fuel Economy Toolkit (http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/toolkit.shtml).

Happy Holidays!

 

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team
technicalresponse@icf.com
800-254-6735

Question of the Month: It’s tax time! What are some common questions related to the federal tax credits for alternative fuels and infrastructure?

March 21, 2016 by Clean Cities

Tax season is upon us, and the recent federal tax incentive extensions and changes impact the alternative fuel and infrastructure tax credits.

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016 (H.R. 2029) retroactively extended several tax credits, including the Alternative Fuel Excise Tax Credit and Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit. It also included updates to the calculation method for Alternative Fuel Excise Tax Credit amounts, specifically for propane and liquefied natural gas (LNG). Below we discuss three frequently asked questions about these credits.

How have the Alternative Fuel Excise Tax Credit amounts changed for propane and LNG in 2016 and beyond?

The Alternative Fuel Excise Tax Credit applies to alternative fuel sold or used to operate a motor vehicle. Previously, the excise tax credit amount for propane and LNG was based on a volumetric basis ($0.50 per gallon). For fuel sold or used starting January 1, 2016, however, the excise tax credit amount for propane and LNG is based on an energy equivalent basis. This means the credit for propane is now measured per gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) and LNG is measured per diesel gallon equivalent (DGE). Specifically, the updated Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Form 8849, Schedule 3 defines 2016 tax credit rates for propane and LNG as follows:

  • Propane: One GGE is equal to 5.75 pounds (lbs.) or 1.353 gallons of propane.
  • LNG: One DGE is equal to 6.06 lbs. or 1.71 gallons of LNG.

What does this mean for propane and natural gas retailers and fleets? In short, the tax credit for the same amount of fuel is now less:

  • The propane tax credit was previously $0.50 per gallon and is now $0.50 per GGE (1.353 gallons of propane), which equates to $0.37 per gallon.
  • The LNG tax credit was previously $0.50 per gallon and is now $0.50 per DGE (1.71 gallons of LNG), which equates to $0.29 per gallon.

The tax credit amount for compressed natural gas (CNG) is still based on the GGE, where one GGE is equal to 121 cubic feet.

Natural Gas Vehicles for America (NGVAmerica) provides additional information on federal tax incentives for LNG and CNG, and highlights the impacts of the recent tax credit changes in the article, New Year Rings in Changes for CNG and LNG in 2016. The National Propane Gas Association explains the excise tax equalization for propane.

So, you said the Alternative Fuel Excise Tax Credit was retroactively extended. Does that mean I can claim it for fuels sold or used in 2015?

Yes! Both the federal Alternative Fuel Excise Tax Credit and Biodiesel Mixture Excise Tax Credit were extended to cover 2015, meaning that propane, CNG, LNG, hydrogen, and biodiesel sold or used in 2015 are eligible for the federal tax credit. To file for the tax credit, registered claimants must submit a single one-time 2015 claim with IRS Form 8849, as well as the accompanying Schedule 3. The deadline to submit a claim for fuels sold or used in 2015 is August 8, 2016.

Please note that the tax credit amount for propane and LNG sold or used in 2015 is based on the previous, volumetric rate of $0.50 per gallon.

For additional information on claiming the tax credit for fuels sold or used in 2015, please see IRS Notice 2016-05.

Are tax-exempt entities eligible for the Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit?

While a tax-exempt entity, such as a school or state government fleet, may not be eligible to claim the Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit directly, the entity selling the fueling infrastructure to the tax-exempt entity can claim the credit and pass the “discount” along to the fleet. According to Title 26 of the United States Code, Section 30C(e)(3), the entity selling the fueling equipment to the tax-exempt entity can be treated as the taxpayer and claim the Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit, but only if the seller discloses the amount of the credit allowable to the tax-exempt purchaser in writing. In practice, this means the tax-exempt fleet would have the opportunity to use this information to request a discount. However, the infrastructure seller is not required to pass along any savings associated with the tax credit.

For more information on how tax-exempt entities may be eligible for the Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit, please see the IRS Instructions for Form 8911.

Please note that the Technical Response Service recommends consulting a qualified tax professional or the IRS before making any tax-related decisions.

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Showcasing National Leadership, Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer Joins Seven Other Mayors to Launch Energy Secure Cities Coalition and Highlight the City’s Transition of its Municipal Fleet to Alternative Fuel Vehicles

March 3, 2016 by Clean Cities

Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer joins coalition seeking to retire 50,000 petroleum-powered vehicles, saving tens of millions in taxpayer dollars and improving U.S. national and economic security.

ORLANDO, FL – Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer joined seven other mayors Thursday in launching the Energy Secure Cities Coalition (ESCC), a group of cities dedicated to transitioning their municipal fleets from petroleum-fueled vehicles to vehicles powered by alternative fuels, like electricity and natural gas.

The City of Orlando has been migrating its fleet to advanced fuel vehicles since 2010 as part of its efforts to be one of the most sustainable cities in the country.  Moving toward the use of advanced fuels benefits both Orlando residents and the environment by reducing the dependence on and use of more expensive fuels, reducing carbon dioxide emissions and saving taxpayers money by reducing fuel and maintenance costs.

“The City of Orlando is committed to taking the steps necessary to preserve our natural resources for our children and future generations to come,” said Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer.  “That’s why we pledged to run City fleet vehicles on 100 percent renewable resources by 2030 as part of our Green Works Orlando sustainability initiative and we are proud to join with other cities in this effort as part of the national Energy Secure Cities Coalition.”

The City of Orlando boasts 1,689 advanced fuel vehicles currently in its fleet and plans to grow this number to a total of 2,389 by 2030.  This year alone, the City of Orlando will deploy a total of 72 new advanced fuel vehicles including 29 CNG and hydraulic-hybrid trucks, 25 Via Motors Plug-in Hybrid-Electric Vehicles (PHEV) and 18 hybrid vehicles.  The City’s first CNG fueling station also began operation this year.

By joining the Energy Secure Cities Coalition, Orlando joins a network of cities that will share best practices and learn from each other before, during and after the fleet conversion process.  In addition to Orlando, the Energy Secure Cities Coalition includes:

  • Atlanta, Ga.
  • Charlotte, N.C.
  • Indianapolis, Ind.
  • Rochester, N.Y.
  • Sacramento Calif.
  • San Diego, Calif.
  • West Palm Beach, Fla.

“With 92 percent of our transportation sector powered by a single fuel—oil—our local economies are dangerously exposed to a volatile, unpredictable global oil market,” said SAFE President and CEO Robbie Diamond. “Cities are America’s centers for innovation, and it is absolutely essential we put that talent to good use protecting us from oil supply disruptions and economically devastating price spikes. And the more we do here at home to lessen our reliance on oil, the more we help our soldiers abroad, who are all too often forced to intervene to protect supply infrastructure in unstable parts of the world.”

Together, the Energy Secure Cities Coalition will grow to 25 cities by 2025 with the goal of taking 50,000 petroleum-powered vehicles off the road, saving 500,000 barrels of oil every year and protecting city budgets from volatile and unpredictable global oil prices.

The ESCC is a project of its member cities in collaboration with Securing America’s Future Energy and the Electrification Coalition. Learn more at www.energysecurecities.org.

###

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Cassandra Lafser, City of Orlando Press Secretary, Cassandra.Lafser@CityofOrlando.net, 407.246.2182

​​​​​Ellen Carey, Securing America’s Future Energy Vice President of Communications, ​​​​​​​ecarey@secureenergy.org​​​​, 202.461.2382

Heather Fagan

Deputy Chief of Staff
City of Orlando, Office of the Mayor
400 S. Orange Ave, 3rd Floor
Orlando, FL 32802

Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit

January 22, 2016 by Clean Cities

NOTE: This incentive originally expired on December 31, 2013, but was retroactively extended through December 31, 2016, by H.R. 2029 (PDF).

Fueling equipment for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane), liquefied hydrogen, electricity, E85, or diesel fuel blends containing a minimum of 20% biodiesel installed between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2016, is eligible for a tax credit of 30% of the cost, not to exceed $30,000. Permitting and inspection fees are not included in covered expenses. Fueling station owners who install qualified equipment at multiple sites are allowed to use the credit towards each location. Consumers who purchased qualified residential fueling equipment prior to December 31, 2016, may receive a tax credit of up to $1,000. Unused credits that qualify as general business tax credits, as defined by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), may be carried backward one year and carried forward 20 years. For more information about claiming the credit, see IRS Form 8911, which is available on the IRS Forms and Publications website. (Reference Public Law 114-113; 26 U.S. Code 30C and 38; and IRS Notice 2007-43 (PDF))

Point of Contact
U.S. Internal Revenue Service
Phone: (800) 829-1040
http://www.irs.gov/

Central Florida Clean Cities November Recap

December 14, 2015 by Clean Cities

2015-Protec_3 On Thursday, Nov. 5, Central Florida Clean Cities welcomed its newest sponsor and member, Protec Fuels, as they sponsored a luncheon and workshop on Green Fleet Solutions. Speakers included Orlando City Commissioner and Mayor Pro Tem Jim Gray, Robert White of the Renewable Fuels Association, Bruce Chesson of NASA/KSC Transportation and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Programs, 100 Best Fleets’ Tom Johnson, David L. Dunn from City of Orlando Fleet and Facilities Management, and Protec Fuel’s Andrew Greenberg to discuss the benefits of adding E85 Flex Fuel to your fleet.

 

2015-Third-Annual-Emerald-Coast-Transportation-Symposium-The Third Annual Emerald Coast Transportation Symposium took place over Nov. 12-13 at the Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort in Miramar Beach, FL.  Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Coordinator Colleen Kettles spoke at the symposium in a panel event on renewable and alternative fuels.  Learn more about the event at http://www.wfrpc.org/events/transportation-symposium.

 

 

 

 
2014-Auto-Show_Volt-Test-DrivesFinally, we capped off the month at the Central Florida International Auto Show, which took place over Nov. 26-29 at the Orange County Convention Center.  We were able to check out many new, exciting, and game-changing alternative fuel vehicles.  Go to http://autoshoworlando.com/ to check out pictures and more information on the event.

We hope you’re all having a wonderful holiday season.  We look forward to reporting back in the new year!

 

 

EV Summit Recap

November 9, 2015 by Clean Cities

We promised you a full recap of the 2015 EV Transportation and Technology Summit, and here it is!  Held at our Florida Solar Energy Center campus in Cocoa, FL from Oct. 20-22, the event was organized by the Electric Vehicle Transportation Center of the University of Central Florida.  The Summit engaged attendees from across the country on the future of Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) and how their expanding adoption effects city, road, and development planning as well as assists in advancing technology, economics, and the environment.

The Summit kicked off with a pre-event PEV Market and Technology Workshop to discuss current trends and opportunities in PEV adoption.  After, Summit attendees were invited on a Kennedy Space Center Tour followed by the opening reception at the Cocoa Beach Courtyard Marriott.

To take a look at the Pre-Summit Workshop Materials, go to http://evtc.fsec.ucf.edu/education/short_course/EV-Workshop.html.

Day 2 began with a focus on PEV Technology, Infrastructure, Product Development, and Resources, featuring presentations on PEV technology and standards, PEV charging technology and the grid, product and market offerings, and vehicle adoption programs and resources.  Trev Hall, Clean Cities Southeast Regional Manager, provided an overview of US Department of Energy Vehicle Technology Office Resources made available through the Alternative Fuels Data Center website.  The day concluded with a PEV Vehicle Display in the Florida Solar Energy Center parking lot nearest the public PEV charging stations.

Finally, Day 3 of the EV Summit featured presentations pertaining to Planning, Policy, and the Future of PEVs.  Linda Bluestein, Co-Director for National Clean Cities, delivered a talk on PEV Public and Policy Awareness as it influences electric vehicle adoption.  Other presentations that followed included an assessment of the current state of the EV, a few discussions of future infrastructure and transportation planning goals, and a concluding panel of Florida electric utilities’ perspectives on PEV advancement.

Please visit the 2015 EV Summit website to take a look at this year’s presentations, presenters, and a full agenda at http://www.evsummit.org/schedule.php.

We thank the Electric Vehicle Transportation Center for organizing the Summit and for allowing Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition to participate in this new and educational event.  Hopefully, we’ll be seeing another wonderful EV Summit in 2016!

Other recent and upcoming events include:

On Thursday, Nov. 5, Central Florida Clean Cities welcomed its newest sponsor and member, Protec Fuels, as they sponsored a luncheon and workshop on Green Fleet Solutions. Speakers included Orlando City Commissioner and Mayor Pro Tem Jim Gray, Robert White of the Renewable Fuels Association, Bruce Chesson of NASA/KSC Transportation and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Programs, 100 Best Fleets’ Tom Johnson, David L. Dunn from City of Orlando Fleet and Facilities Management, and Protec Fuel’s Andrew Greenberg to discuss the benefits of adding E85 Flex Fuel to your fleet..

Finally, the Third Annual Emerald Coast Transportation Symposium will take place Nov. 12-13 at the Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort in Miramar Beach, FL.  Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Coordinator Colleen Kettles will be speaking at the symposium in a panel event on renewable and alternative fuels.  Learn more and register for the event at http://www.wfrpc.org/events/transportation-symposium.

We look forward to reporting back again soon!

Photos

Co-Director for National Clean Cities, US DOE Linda Bluestein delivers a presentation on Electric Vehicle Public and Policy Awareness at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

Co-Director for National Clean Cities, US DOE Linda Bluestein delivers a presentation on Electric Vehicle Public and Policy Awareness at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, James Culp of Duke Energy describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, James Culp of Duke Energy describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, Todd Jensen of Florida Power and Light describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, Todd Jensen of Florida Power and Light describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, Bryan Coley of Gulf Power describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, Bryan Coley of Gulf Power describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, JEA’s Peter King describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, JEA’s Peter King describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, OUC’s Eva Reyes describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, OUC’s Eva Reyes describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, TECO’s Keith Gruetzmacher describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A participant in the Electric Utility Perspective Panel, TECO’s Keith Gruetzmacher describes his business’s electric vehicle and alternative fuels advancement programs at the 2015 EV Summit in Cocoa, FL. Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Participants were able to climb inside the different vehicles to learn more about the model options and which vehicle offerings best matched their business and personal needs.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL. Participants were able to climb inside the different vehicles to learn more about the model options and which vehicle offerings best matched their business and personal needs.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Pictured here is a new 2015 VIA Motors Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV), provided by Florida Power and Light.  Many other utilities are also currently using and expanding their fleets of PEVs.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL. Pictured here is a new 2015 VIA Motors Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV), provided by Florida Power and Light. Many other utilities are also currently using and expanding their fleets of PEVs. Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Pictured are a Chevy Volt and a Nissan Leaf actively charging at the Florida Solar Energy Center public PEV charging stations.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL. Pictured are a Chevy Volt and a Nissan Leaf actively charging at the Florida Solar Energy Center public PEV charging stations. Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL.  Pictured is a participating Tesla Model S vehicle.  Photo by Nick Waters.

A Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Display was held on October 21, 2015 at the EV Transportation and Technology Summit in Cocoa, FL. Pictured is a participating Tesla Model S vehicle. Photo by Nick Waters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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