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Summary of Alternative Fuel Tax Credit Extensions the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (H.R. 1892)

February 12, 2018 by Clean Cities

On Friday, February 9, President Trump signed the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (H.R. 1892). Division D of the Act retroactively extends many tax credits.

There are several Bipartisan Budget Act provisions with implications for Clean Cities portfolio items:

  • Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit. Section 40404 extends the tax credit for alternative fuel infrastructure through December 31, 2017. Fueling equipment for natural gas, propane, liquefied hydrogen, electricity, E85, and biodiesel are eligible for a tax credit of 30%, up to $30,000. Residential fueling equipment may receive a tax credit up to $1,000.
  • Alternative Fuel Excise Tax Credit. Section 40415 extends the $0.50 per gallon tax credit for alternative fuels, including liquefied hydrogen, through December 31, 2017.
  • Alternative Fuel Mixture Excise Tax Credit. Section 40415 also extends the $0.50 per gallon tax credit for alternative fuel used to produce a mixture containing at least 0.1% gasoline, diesel, or kerosene through December 31, 2017. Alternative fuel blenders must be registered with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The U.S. Department of the Treasury (Treasury) will issue guidance for how to submit claims for this credit by March 11, 2018.
  • Biodiesel Income Tax Credit. Section 40407 extends the biodiesel income tax credit through December 31, 2017. A taxpayer that delivers unblended biodiesel (B100) into the tank of a vehicle may be eligible for a $1.00 per gallon of biodiesel, agri-biodiesel, or renewable diesel tax credit.
  • Biodiesel Mixture Excise Tax Credit. Section 40407 also extends the $0.50 per gallon tax credit for biodiesel, agri-biodiesel, or renewable diesel used to produce a mixture containing at least 0.1% gasoline, diesel, or kerosene through December 31, 2017. Alternative fuel blenders must be registered with the IRS. Treasury will issue guidance for how to submit claims for this credit by March 11, 2018.
  • Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit. Section 40403 extends the $4,000 tax credit for the purchase of qualified light-duty fuel cell vehicles through December 31, 2017.
  • Qualified Two-Wheeled Plug-In Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Tax Credit. Section 40405 extends the two-wheeled plug-in electric drive motor vehicle tax credit through December 31, 2017. Qualified vehicles are eligible for a tax credit of 10% of the cost of the vehicle, up to $2,500.
  • Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit. Section 40406 extends the tax credit for second generation biofuel producers through December 31, 2017. Second generation biofuel producers registered with the IRS may be eligible for a $1.01 per gallon of biodiesel tax credit.
  • Second Generation Biofuel Production Property Depreciation Allowance. Section 40412 extends the 50% special depreciation allowance for second generation biofuel production plants through December 31, 2017.

The changes outlined above are effective immediately. To view the full text of the Bipartisan Budget Act, visit https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-115hr1892enr/pdf/BILLS-115hr1892enr.pdf. See the Alternative Fuels Data Center Federal Laws and Incentives page for descriptions of each incentive.

Fleets for the Future: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Procurement Best Practices

February 5, 2018 by Clean Cities

The Fleets for the Future team has put together four best practice guides to help fleets prepare to successfully deploy alternative fuel vehicles. These best practices build upon both the extensive information provided by the U.S. DOE and a number of recent successful case studies. The specific goal of these best practice guides is to educate procurement officers, fleet managers, and other interested stakeholders to plan for a large scale deployment of AFVs.

STAY TUNED: Fleets for the Future plans to highlight alternative fuel school buses and refuse haulers in early 2018. Contact us with any questions or information on your fleet needs!

  • Gaseous Fuel Vehicle Procurement Best Practices Guide
    This guide briefly summarizes the basic attributes and benefits of both gaseous-fuels and their respective vehicle technologies, then explores best applications and why, highlighting the relationship between upfront premiums, fuel use, and vehicle maintenance to total cost of ownership (TCO). The guide also provides information about fueling infrastructure options and offers planning guidance. Finally, it reviews steps that lead organizations will need to undertake to build a successful cooperative purchasing initiative.
  • Electric Vehicle Procurement Best Practices Guide
    This guide is meant to help fleets and regionally-based buying cooperatives in understanding the benefits of deploying electric vehicles (EVs), as well as EV-specific considerations involved in the procurement process. Topics below cover both battery electric vehicles (BEV), which run solely on electricity as well as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), which use batteries to power an electric motor and use another fuel, such as gasoline, diesel, or fuel cells, to power an internal combustion engine.
  • Guide to Financing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Procurement
    This document lays out the common strategies available for public and private fleets attempting to finance an investment in alternative fuel vehicles. While not all options are available to all fleets, the intent is to educate fleet managers on the best practices and challenges associated with implementation of each strategy.
  • Fleet Transition Planning for Alternative Fuel Vehicles
    This document presents general fuel-neutral guidelines on planning a coordinated bulk procurement of AFVs. It discusses stakeholder engagement efforts, goal setting, prioritization of vehicle procurements, and planning for implementation of a successful procurement.

Plug-In Perks From Drive Electric Orlando

February 5, 2018 by Clean Cities

Drive Electric Orlando is a groundbreaking partnership between Enterprise Car Rental, hotels, and tourist attractions designed to offer vacationers and business travelers an exciting and convenient opportunity to use an eco-friendly car during their next trip.

Your trip to Orlando was always going to be great. But because you rented a Chevy Volt, you also scored a Plug-In Perks Pass for a VIP experience!

For more information, please visit http://pluginperks.com/plug-in-perks/

Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Emergency Preparedness

October 9, 2017 by Clean Cities

MotorWeek has produced an expanded segment on AFVs and emergency preparedness, titled Emergency Alternatives, that will start airing on PBS stations nationwide on October 14, 2017.

For showtimes in your area, check the MotorWeek and Discovery Channel websites. MotorWeek is also available in high definition on Velocity by Discovery.

 

They’re Here! Station Locator Android App and Mobile Trip Calculator

June 21, 2017 by Clean Cities

What’s new for Clean Cities mobile tools and resources?  Two new mobile tools have recently become available:

  • Station Locator app for Android: Android users can now access the Station Locator app through the Google Play store. As with the original iPhone app version, users can access the Station Locator from their mobile device and find the 20 closest stations within a 30-mile radius. Results display either on a map or in a list with station addresses, phone numbers, and hours of operation. Also available for iPhone from the iTunes store.
  • Trip Calculator mobile page: FuelEconomy.gov recently launched a mobile web page version of their popular Trip Calculator tool. This page allows users to easily calculate fuel economy for a trip while on the go.

Other Mobile Resources

  • AFDC Station Locator mobile page: If you’d rather not use an app, the Station Locator mobile page provides an easy way to view alternative fueling station information on your smartphone screen, regardless of the type of mobile device used. Users can access the Station Locator by navigating to this link in an internet browser.
  • Find-a-Car app (Android and iPhone): The Find-a-Car app allows users to view the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fuel economy ratings, fuel cost estimates, and safety ratings for new and used cars and trucks. The app also allows users to input driving habits to personalize results, and to scan QR codes on window stickers while car shopping to assist in comparing vehicles. The app is available to download on the Google Play store and download on the iTunes store.
  • Find and Compare Cars mobile page: The Find and Compare Cars mobile page allows users to search for vehicles by year, make, and model. Searches can also filter by vehicle class and combined miles per gallon (MPG).
  • EPA Fuel Economy Label mobile page: The EPA Fuel Economy Label mobile page explains what each piece of information detailed on fuel economy labels for gasoline, plug-in hybrid, and all-electric vehicles means.
  • Calculate My MPG mobile page: On this page, users receive assistance calculating and tracking fuel economy and comparing it with the EPA ratings. To get started, users must first create an account by accessing the tool online. Look for an update to the mobile page later this year.
  • Gas Mileage Tips mobile page: This page provides drivers with quick tips to obtaining better gas mileage and shows how much money per gallon they can save as a result.

You can rate and provide feedback on the Google Play and iTunes stores for the Station Locator and Find-a-Car apps. You may also contact the TRS at any time with feedback about these mobile resources, as well as suggestions for new tools.

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team
technicalresponse@icf.com
800-254-6735

Question of the Month: How can I compare the energy content of alternative fuels and gasoline or diesel? What implications does this have for overall fuel and vehicle comparisons?

April 26, 2017 by Clean Cities

Measuring Fuels: Understanding and Using Gasoline Gallon Equivalents
Alternative fuels have varying energy densities and are measured using a number of different units, which can make comparing them tricky. The gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) unit allows drivers to make apples-to-apples comparisons of a given quantity of energy from alternative fuels and assess which fuel best suits their needs. Understanding the energy content of fuels can help inform comparisons of fuel prices and vehicle driving range.

What is a GGE? How about a DGE?

A GGE is a standardized unit used to compare the energy content of all fuels. This unit quantifies the amount of alternative fuel that has the equivalent energy content of one gallon of conventional gasoline. For medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fuel applications, diesel gallon equivalent (DGE) is often used.

How are GGE and DGE values determined?

Energy content is measured in British thermal units (Btus) per gallon of fuel, and is often referred to as the lower heating value of the fuel. To calculate GGE and DGE, the energy content of one gallon of gasoline or diesel is divided by the energy content of the comparison fuel. For example, conventional gasoline has an energy content of 116,090 Btus per gallon, while propane has an energy content of 84,250 Btus per gallon. As such, 1.38 gallons of propane has the same amount of energy as one gallon of conventional gasoline.

The table below displays the energy content, GGE, and DGE values of conventional and alternative fuels.

Fuel

Energy Content*

Quantity of Fuel in 1 GGE

Quantity of Fuel in 1 DGE

Gasoline 116,090 Btu/gallon 1.00 gallon 1.11 gallon
Low Sulfur Diesel 128,488 Btu/gallon 0.90 gallon 1.00 gallon
Biodiesel (B20) 126,700 Btu/gallon 0.92 gallon 1.01 gallon
Biodiesel (B100) 119,550 Btu/gallon 0.97 gallon 1.07 gallon
Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) 923 Btu/cubic foot (ft3)
or
20,160 Btu/lb
125.77 ft3
or
5.76 lb
139.21 ft3
or
6.37 lb
Liquefied Natural Gas 21,240 Btu/lb 5.47 lb 6.05 lb
Ethanol (E100) 76,330 Btu/gallon 1.52 gallon 1.68 gallon
Ethanol (E85)** 88,258 Btu/gallon 1.32 gallon 1.46 gallon
Electricity*** 3,414 Btu/kilowatt hour (kWh) 34.00 kWh 37.64 kWh
Propane 84,250 Btu/gallon 1.38 gallon 1.53 gallon
Hydrogen 288.88 Btu/ft3
or
51,585 Btu/lb
401.86 ft3
or
2.25 lb
444.78 ft3
or
2.49 lb

* Lower heating value. Source for CNG and hydrogen (Btu/ft3): Transportation Energy Data Book, Edition 35. Source for remaining values: Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) Fuel Properties.

** E85 that is sold in the United States today actually contains, on average, approximately 70% ethanol. Therefore, E85 energy content calculated as [(.70) x (E100 energy content)] + [(.30) x (gasoline energy content)]

*** Electric vehicles are more efficient (on a Btu basis) than combustion engines, which should be taken into account when calculating and comparing miles per GGE (see below).

The values in the table above can help standardize fuel amounts for comparisons. For example, if you have 10,000 ft3 of CNG, you can determine the equivalent number of GGEs by dividing by 125.77 ft3 to get 79.5 GGE. Similarly, to determine the number of DGEs, you would divide by 139.21 ft3 to get 71.83 DGE.

How are GGE and DGE used to compare fuel prices?

Fuel prices can be represented in dollars per GGE or DGE for consistency in pricing between fuels. For that reason, the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report shows prices on an energy-equivalent basis (Table 3 in recent reports). If values for price per GGE or DGE are not available, you can do the calculation on your own. For instance, if one gallon of E85 is $2.04, you would multiply by 1.32 (see table above ) to find that this price equates to $2.69 per GGE after adjusting for energy content.

What are the factors that impact how far I can drive between fill ups?

The energy content of fuels is one factor that affects driving range. Filling up with a less energy-dense fuel often means that you will not be able to drive as far. However, tank size and vehicle efficiency also play a significant role.

Some alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) have similar tank sizes to conventional vehicles, while others have larger fuel tanks to compensate for the difference in energy content. For example, vehicles that run on propane and biodiesel typically have similarly sized fuel tanks as their conventional fuel counterparts. As you can see in the table above, both of these fuels have lower energy densities than their conventional fuel counterparts, which subsequently can result in lower fuel economy and shorter range per tank. In the case of propane, bi-fuel vehicles are available that can operate on both conventional fuel and propane for extended driving range. In addition, propane and biodiesel offer many other benefits that can offset this difference.

CNG and hydrogen vehicles, on the other hand, often have larger tanks to offset the lower energy densities associated with these fuels. Fleets and drivers purchasing a CNG vehicle may have the option to install an additional CNG storage tank onboard the vehicle. Alternatively, bi-fuel CNG vehicles are also available to extend the range. As for hydrogen, these vehicles tend to have larger fuel tanks overall.

Tank size is not the only other factor that affects range; vehicle efficiency also plays a role. For instance, all-electric vehicles (EVs) are significantly more efficient than conventional gasoline vehicles. According to FuelEconomy.gov, EVs use anywhere from 59% to 62% of the electricity from the grid to power the vehicle, while conventional gasoline vehicles can only convert 17% to 21% of the energy from gasoline to power the vehicle. This is one reason why EVs have such significant fuel economy advantages over conventional vehicles, even when you are comparing the fuels on an energy-equivalent basis.

For more information, contact:

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team
technicalresponse@icfi.com800-254-6735

EV Transportation and Technology Summit 2016

September 30, 2016 by Clean Cities

Hosted annually by the Electric Vehicle Transportation Center (EVTC) at UCF’s regional campus at the Florida Solar Energy Center in Cocoa, Fla., this year’s national Summit is focused on the transportation planning and infrastructure requirements accelerating the deployment of electric vehicles. Sixteen speakers will address current topics, including electric transit buses, wireless electric vehicle charging and the economics of electric vehicles. The speakers will also be looking to the future of transportation with presentations on planning for the next generation of innovative transportation and mobility. Speaker panel discussions, technical workshops and a poster session are also planned.

Registration, schedules, hotels and other information can be found at evsummit.org. The last day for early registration and a special hotel rate is September 30th.

Summit sponsors include TECO Energy, Navigant Research, Proterra, OUC, Clipper Creek, NovaCharge, AutoPort, JEA, FPL, Drive Electric Florida and Central Florida Clean Cities.

EVSummit

About EVTC

The Electric Vehicle Transportation Center (EVTC) is a University Transportation Center funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation, and is the only center focused on electric vehicles. This research and education effort to help create the nation’s electric-vehicle transportation network is operated by the University of Central Florida’s Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) with partner universities, the University of Hawaii and Tuskegee University. The EVTC is bridging the gap between deployment of electric vehicles and the traditional transportation system. The EVTC researches and develops technologies, standards, planning and policies to ensure seamless integration of electric vehicles into a complex transportation network and supporting electricity grid. For more information, visit evtc.fsec.ucf.edu/.

About FSEC

The Florida Solar Energy Center, UCF’s energy research and education institute, was established in 1975. Located on the Cocoa campus of UCF and Eastern Florida State College, FSEC has gained national and international respect for its public and private partnerships, focusing on: solar energy, energy-efficient buildings, hydrogen and fuel cells, electric vehicles, smart-grid research, and testing and certification of solar equipment. The Center conducts continuing education and training programs for professionals, government and industry leaders around the world, in addition to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) opportunities for the future energy workforce. For more information, visit www.fsec.ucf.edu.

America’s Partnership University

The University of Central Florida, the nation’s second-largest university with more than 60,000 students, has grown in size, quality, diversity and reputation in its first 50 years. Today, the university offers more than 200 degree programs at its main campus in Orlando and more than a dozen other locations. UCF is an economic engine attracting and supporting industries vital to the region’s future while providing students with real-world experiences that help them succeed after graduation. For more information, visit http://today.ucf.edu

Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition 2016 Spring Recap

September 26, 2016 by Clean Cities

The Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition has been keeping busy, working to maintain its status as Central Florida’s leading alternative fuel technologies and vehicle advocates.  In February, Central Florida Clean Cities met virtually before a board at DOE headquarters comprised of Clean Cities Regional Managers, DOE labs personnel, and other program participants.  During this meeting, the coalition presented on its various alternative fuel and emissions reductions programs and partners, reaffirming its commitment to the Central Florida region with its many sustainability projects.  The Department of Energy has once again accepted our pledge, officially redesignating the coalition as a Clean Cities Coalition for the next three years.

The 2015 Clean Cities Annual Report was submitted in March and reflected the cumulative efforts of our Central Florida region, calculating the emissions reductions of Central Florida Clean Cities’ partner fleets.  In 2015, regional fleet managers report a cumulative 4,641,614 gallons of gasoline equivalent reductions, which means a GHG emissions reduction of almost 26,000 tons (a record high for Central Florida).  The majority of these reductions were achieved by local fleets adopting alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure.  Congratulations, Clean Cities partners, and thank you for doing your part in enhancing transportation in our region.

Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition also did its part in attending various energy and alternative fuel vehicle conferences since the start of the year.  For instance, coalition representatives participated in the 2016 Energy Solutions Conference.  Held March 23-24, it was a sequel to the highly successful Virtual Conferences held in 2013 and 2012.  It was a Simulcast—a virtual event accessed by any computer or mobile device as well as in person at the Florida Solar Energy Center in Cocoa, FL.  The event featured presentations on energy options and choices, both now and in the future, with recognized experts from across the country speaking on topics such as renewable energy, energy efficiency, transportation planning, and more.  On Thursday, March 24, Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Coordinator Colleen Kettles moderated a panel on Clean Cities and Alternative Fuel Vehicles, attended by representatives from various vehicle manufacturers, utilities, and clean cities stakeholders.  To learn more about this event, please visit the Energy Solutions Conference website at http://conference.energysmartplanning.org/home.html.

Next, Drive Electric Florida (DEF) hosted its first 2016 meeting in Jacksonville on Monday, April 4 at the newly constructed North Florida Regional Transportation Management Center.  This state-of-the-art center opened last November, culminating a 12 year partnership between the North Florida TPO, the Florida Dept. of Transportation, and the Florida Highway Patrol to work towards safe and efficient travel in the Northeast Florida area.  The meeting featured speakers on industry updates, utility PEV updates, EV outreach events, and DEF committee reports.  This included a report on the newly formed Drive Electric Florida Workplace Charging (WPC) Committee, which first started meeting in early 2016.  Chaired by Peter King of Jacksonville Electric Authority and staffed by the Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition, the committee is in the process of pledging to be a Workplace Charging Challenge Ambassador, working on behalf of DOE to assist local businesses with WPC adoption.  To learn more about Drive Electric Florida or the Workplace Charging Challenge, please visit the DEF website:  http://driveelectricflorida.org/.

Melbourne-Train-the-Trainer-2Central Florida Clean Cities then kicked off its First Responders Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Safety Training program in Melbourne on April 19.  This was the first of many “train the trainers” sessions, during which local first responder trainers are taught how to conduct workshops with their teams on approaching AFV collisions, particularly for propane, CNG/LNG, and electric vehicles.  This program will continue throughout the year with scheduled trainings pending in Tampa, Ocala, Broward County, and Jacksonville.

On April 20, intern Shauna Basques spoke on her year’s work with the Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition in the Clean Cities University Workforce Development Program’s end of semester presentation.  Busy staffing the Drive Electric Florida Workplace Charging Committee and assisting Coordinator Colleen Kettles with program projects and events, Shauna continued her work throughout the summer, advancing alternative fuel vehicle adoption.

2016-NASA_KSC-Earth-Day-EventCentral Florida Clean Cities also partnered with the Florida Solar Energy Center to present on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and alternative fuel vehicle solutions at the Kennedy Space Center/NASA’s Earth Day celebration, April 21 – 22.  On the event’s first day, presenters met with KSC/NASA personnel, displaying a Chevy Volt, a Nissan LEAF, and two solar ovens.  On the second day, these displays were moved into the Kennedy Space Center’s Visitor Complex, near the Rocket Garden, where presenters were able to meet with KSC visitors and staff alike, speaking on the benefits of AFVs and alternative energy sources.

EnergyWhiz took over the Florida Solar Energy Center in Cocoa, FL on Saturday, May 14.  Hundreds of students participated in renewable energy events, including a solar car sprint, an energy transfer machine competition, a solar energy cook-off, a display of EVs and the Electrathon.  For more information on the event, please visit http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/education/k-12/energywhiz_olympics/index.htm.

2016-Energy-Whiz-ElectrathonFinally, we attended the US DOE Clean Cities Southeast Regional Meeting in Jacksonville, May 18-20, 2016, where CFCCC Coordinator Colleen Kettles made a presentation on the FAST Act and its EV Corridor implications. On May 24, she traveled to NREL in Golden Colorado for a Clean Cities meeting on advanced technology vehicles and their impact on Clean Cities activities.

Although we’re done with spring, we’ll be reporting back on our summer events soon.  In the meantime, check out the upcoming 2016 EV Transportation and Technology Summit at http://www.EVsummit.org.  Hosted at the Florida Solar Energy Center in Cocoa, FL over October 17-20, the summit will feature presentations and industry panels on electric vehicle transportation planning, policy building, and future technologies designed to promote electric vehicle advancement.  Register now!

Question of the Month: Clean Cities uses a lot of acronyms. What are the most important ones to understand?

February 18, 2016 by Clean Cities
Say What? 10 Clean Cities Acronyms You Should Know

Have you ever been on the DOE’s AFDC to learn about EVSE for EVs or PHEVs to meet EPAct requirements? Let’s take a step back. Perhaps you feel like you need a translator just to understand the basics of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. If this sounds familiar, get in the know with our list of the top Clean Cities acronyms, broken down into 10 categories:

  1. Federal Agencies and National Laboratories
    1. DOE: U.S. Department of Energy. DOE includes:
      1. EIA: Energy Information Administration
      2. DOE National Laboratories:
        1. ANL: Argonne National Laboratory
        2. INL: Idaho National Laboratory
        3. NREL: National Renewable Energy Laboratory
        4. ORNL: Oak Ridge National Laboratory
        5. PNNL: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    2. DOT: U.S. Department of Transportation. DOT includes:
      1. FHWA: Federal Highway Administration
    3. EPA: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  2. AFDC: Alternative Fuels Data Center
  3. Vehicle Characteristics
    1. GVWR: Gross vehicle weight rating
    2. VMT: Vehicle miles traveled
  4. Fuel Economy
    1. MPG: Miles per gallon
    2. MPGe: Miles per gallon of gasoline-equivalent
    3. GGE: Gasoline-gallon equivalent
    4. DGE: Diesel-gallon equivalent
  5. Vehicle Classes
    1. LDV: Light-duty vehicle
    2. MDV: Medium-duty vehicle
    3. HDV: Heavy-duty vehicle
  6. Vehicle Emissions and Pollutants
    1. GHG: Greenhouse gas:
      1. CO2: Carbon dioxide
    2. Air pollutants:
      1. CO: Carbon monoxide
      2. NOx: Oxides of nitrogen
      3. SOx: Oxides of sulfur
      4. PM: Particulate matter
      5. VOC: Volatile organic compound
  7. Alternative Fuels and Alternative Fuel Vehicles
    1. AFV: Alternative fuel vehicle
    2. Biodiesel
      1. B5: 5% biodiesel, 95% petroleum diesel
      2. B20: 20% biodiesel, 80% petroleum diesel
      3. B100: 100% biodiesel
    3. Electricity
      1. HEV: Hybrid electric vehicle
      2. PEV: Plug-in electric vehicle. PEVs include:
        1. PHEV: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle
        2. EV: All-electric vehicle
      3. EVSE: Electric vehicle supply equipment
    4. Ethanol
      1. E85: A high-level ethanol-gasoline blend containing 51%-83% ethanol, depending on geography and season.
      2. FFV: Flexible fuel vehicle
    5. Hydrogen
      1. FCEV: Fuel cell electric vehicle
    6. Natural Gas
      1. CNG: Compressed natural gas
      2. LNG: Liquefied natural gas
      3. RNG: Renewable natural gas
      4. NGV: Natural gas vehicle
    7. Propane
      1. LPG: Liquefied petroleum gas
  8. Clean Cities Tools and Resources
    1. GREET: Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation tool
    2. AFLEET: Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Transportation tool
    3. PREP: Petroleum Reduction Planning tool
    4. VICE: Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation model
  9. Federal Programs
    1. CAFE: Corporate Average Fuel Economy
    2. CMAQ: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement
    3. RFS: Renewable Fuel Standard
      1. RIN: Renewable Identification Number
  10. Key Federal Legislation
    1. CAA: Clean Air Act of 1970
    2. EPAct: Energy Policy Act
    3. EISA: Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007
    4. ARRA: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) of 2009

 

Bonus
TRS: Technical Response Service: Sometimes you even need an acronym to figure out an acronym! That’s where the TRS comes in!

For more information:

 

 

Central Florida Clean Cities November Recap

December 14, 2015 by Clean Cities

2015-Protec_3 On Thursday, Nov. 5, Central Florida Clean Cities welcomed its newest sponsor and member, Protec Fuels, as they sponsored a luncheon and workshop on Green Fleet Solutions. Speakers included Orlando City Commissioner and Mayor Pro Tem Jim Gray, Robert White of the Renewable Fuels Association, Bruce Chesson of NASA/KSC Transportation and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Programs, 100 Best Fleets’ Tom Johnson, David L. Dunn from City of Orlando Fleet and Facilities Management, and Protec Fuel’s Andrew Greenberg to discuss the benefits of adding E85 Flex Fuel to your fleet.

 

2015-Third-Annual-Emerald-Coast-Transportation-Symposium-The Third Annual Emerald Coast Transportation Symposium took place over Nov. 12-13 at the Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort in Miramar Beach, FL.  Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Coordinator Colleen Kettles spoke at the symposium in a panel event on renewable and alternative fuels.  Learn more about the event at http://www.wfrpc.org/events/transportation-symposium.

 

 

 

 
2014-Auto-Show_Volt-Test-DrivesFinally, we capped off the month at the Central Florida International Auto Show, which took place over Nov. 26-29 at the Orange County Convention Center.  We were able to check out many new, exciting, and game-changing alternative fuel vehicles.  Go to http://autoshoworlando.com/ to check out pictures and more information on the event.

We hope you’re all having a wonderful holiday season.  We look forward to reporting back in the new year!

 

 

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