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What are the current and future medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions standards?

October 10, 2016 by Clean Cities

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from medium- and heavy-duty vehicles (collectively, HDVs) are expected to surpass light-duty vehicle (LDV) emissions by 2030. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 directed the U.S. Department of Transportation to establish fuel efficiency standards for HDVs. Then, in 2010, President Obama announced a new national program to implement coordinated fuel efficiency and GHG emissions standards for medium- and heavy-duty engines and vehicles. As you may have seen last month, EPA and NHSTA recently finalized the most recent set of requirements under this program.

First promulgated by EPA and NHTSA in 2011, these coordinated standards are being implemented in two separate phases, beginning with Model Year (MY) 2014 to 2018 (Phase 1, which has now been extended through 2020) and followed by MYs 2021 to 2027 (Phase 2), with some exceptions. Under Phase 1, the GHG emissions and fuel efficiency standards generally increase in stringency in MY 2017, then remain steady through MY 2020. GHG emissions and fuel efficiency standards under Phase 2 of the program increase first in MY 2021, and then again in MYs 2024 and 2027. Although the Phase 2 standards do not begin until MY 2021, manufacturers may need to begin compliance measures beforehand in order to be adequately prepared to meet the targets.

Fuel efficiency and GHG emissions standards are determined differently for each of five regulated heavy-duty (HD) engine and vehicle categories: combination tractors; vocational vehicles; HD engines used in combination tractors and vocational vehicles; trailers used with combination tractors; and HD pickup trucks and vans. For more information on these categories, please refer to pages 3 and 4 of the EPA Phase 2 fact sheet (https://www3.epa.gov/otaq/climate/documents/420f16044.pdf).

NHTSA Fuel Efficiency Standards

NHTSA’s fuel efficiency standards are designed to take into account the different functions of each of the regulated vehicle categories. Therefore, the standards are calculated differently for each vehicle category. For HD pickup trucks and vans, there are separate gasoline and diesel target values.

The vehicle-based standards for combination tractors and vocational vehicles are calculated based on weight class, as well as specific characteristics of the vehicle category that affect fuel consumption and emissions, such as roof height for combination tractors and drive cycle for vocational vehicles.

The HD engine standards are determined by the size of the engine, the fuel type (diesel or gasoline), and the characteristics of the respective vehicles into which they are installed. The HD pickup and van standards, engine and chassis included, are fleet-average standards based on fuel-specific (gasoline and diesel) target values that are determined by a “work factor” curve. The “work factor” curve takes into account the payload and towing capacity of the vehicle and whether the vehicle has 4-wheel drive. Like the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) program for LDVs, the HD pickup and van targets are production-weighted based on the manufacturer’s total sales volume of all of its different HD pickup and van models.

Compliance Timeline

Manufacturers were required to meet Phase 1 fuel efficiency standards for combination tractors, vocational vehicles, and HD engines beginning either in MY 2016 or 2017. Phase 2 standards apply in MY 2027, with phase-in standards for MYs 2021 and 2024. Trailer fuel efficiency standards are voluntary beginning in MY 2018, and mandatory effective MY 2021. Manufacturers were not required to participate in the Phase 1 HD pickup and van program until MY 2016. At the outset of the program, NHTSA gave manufacturers the option to choose one of the alternative phase-in options for the Phase 1 standards. Phase 2 HD pickup and van standards begin in MY 2021 and increase in stringency by 2.5% each model year through MY 2027.

Fuel Efficiency Standards and Targets

To view the final Phase 1 standards and HD pickup and van targets, please see the Phase 1 Final Rule. For the recently finalized Phase 2 standards and targets, see the Phase 2 Final Rule. You may also reach out to TRS directly (technicalresponse@icfi.com) if you would like specific information about where to find the finalized standards.

EPA GHG Emissions Standards

EPA also takes into account the varying functions of each of the regulated vehicle categories in its GHG emissions calculation. It uses the same factors as NHTSA to determine emissions standards for each vehicle category, except measurements are based on grams of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted.

Compliance Timeline

EPA’s mandatory Phase 1 GHG emissions standards for combination tractors, vocational vehicles, and HD engines began in MY 2014. The timeline for the Phase 2 standards mirrors that of the NHTSA fuel efficiency standards. However, Phase 2 trailer emissions standards differ in that they are mandatory in MY 2018. For Phase 1 of the HD pickup truck and van program, similar to the fuel efficiency targets, manufacturers were given the option to choose from two alternative phase-in options. As with the Phase 2 fuel efficiency targets, the separate GHG emissions targets for diesel and gasoline HD pickups and vans will increase in stringency under Phase 2 by 2.5% per year from MY 2021 to 2027.

Emissions Standards and Targets

GHG emissions standards and targets for Phase 1 and Phase 2 can be found in their respective final rules. Please refer to the Fuel Efficiency Standards and Targets section above for more information.

Compliance

Manufacturers may employ many different compliance measures to meet the fuel efficiency and GHG emissions standards. These measures vary depending on the vehicle category. Each vehicle category has a different certification testing process to determine its GHG emissions and fuel efficiency values. These values are the baseline to which any additional earned credits can be added. The regulation also offers incentives to encourage advanced vehicle technologies

The credits and incentives available for both the EPA and NHTSA programs include:

  • Advanced Technology Credits: Phase 1 of the program incentivizes manufacturers to produce advance technology vehicles and engines by effectively allowing manufacturers to “count” certain vehicle and engine types as more than one in their compliance calculations. This includes vehicles with hybrid powertrains and Rankine-cycle waste heat recovery systems, as well as plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs). As the new Phase 2 standards are premised on some use of Rankine-cycle engines and hybrid powertrains, these technologies will not qualify as advanced technologies under Phase 2. From MY 2021 through MY 2027, advanced technology credits (with considerably higher multipliers) will only be offered for PEVs and FCEVs.
  • Innovative Technology and Off-Cycle Credits: Both Phases 1 and 2 of the program allow manufacturers to earn credits for off-cycle technologies that result in benefits that are not captured in certification testing procedures.
  • Early Credit Multipliers: Phase 1 of the program enabled manufacturers to earn credits for early compliance. Phase 2 will not include early credits.

For more information on the medium- and heavy-duty engine and vehicle GHG emissions and fuel efficiency standards, please refer to the following resources:

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team

technicalresponse@icfi.com

800-254-6735

Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition 2016 Spring Recap

September 26, 2016 by Clean Cities

The Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition has been keeping busy, working to maintain its status as Central Florida’s leading alternative fuel technologies and vehicle advocates.  In February, Central Florida Clean Cities met virtually before a board at DOE headquarters comprised of Clean Cities Regional Managers, DOE labs personnel, and other program participants.  During this meeting, the coalition presented on its various alternative fuel and emissions reductions programs and partners, reaffirming its commitment to the Central Florida region with its many sustainability projects.  The Department of Energy has once again accepted our pledge, officially redesignating the coalition as a Clean Cities Coalition for the next three years.

The 2015 Clean Cities Annual Report was submitted in March and reflected the cumulative efforts of our Central Florida region, calculating the emissions reductions of Central Florida Clean Cities’ partner fleets.  In 2015, regional fleet managers report a cumulative 4,641,614 gallons of gasoline equivalent reductions, which means a GHG emissions reduction of almost 26,000 tons (a record high for Central Florida).  The majority of these reductions were achieved by local fleets adopting alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure.  Congratulations, Clean Cities partners, and thank you for doing your part in enhancing transportation in our region.

Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition also did its part in attending various energy and alternative fuel vehicle conferences since the start of the year.  For instance, coalition representatives participated in the 2016 Energy Solutions Conference.  Held March 23-24, it was a sequel to the highly successful Virtual Conferences held in 2013 and 2012.  It was a Simulcast—a virtual event accessed by any computer or mobile device as well as in person at the Florida Solar Energy Center in Cocoa, FL.  The event featured presentations on energy options and choices, both now and in the future, with recognized experts from across the country speaking on topics such as renewable energy, energy efficiency, transportation planning, and more.  On Thursday, March 24, Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition Coordinator Colleen Kettles moderated a panel on Clean Cities and Alternative Fuel Vehicles, attended by representatives from various vehicle manufacturers, utilities, and clean cities stakeholders.  To learn more about this event, please visit the Energy Solutions Conference website at http://conference.energysmartplanning.org/home.html.

Next, Drive Electric Florida (DEF) hosted its first 2016 meeting in Jacksonville on Monday, April 4 at the newly constructed North Florida Regional Transportation Management Center.  This state-of-the-art center opened last November, culminating a 12 year partnership between the North Florida TPO, the Florida Dept. of Transportation, and the Florida Highway Patrol to work towards safe and efficient travel in the Northeast Florida area.  The meeting featured speakers on industry updates, utility PEV updates, EV outreach events, and DEF committee reports.  This included a report on the newly formed Drive Electric Florida Workplace Charging (WPC) Committee, which first started meeting in early 2016.  Chaired by Peter King of Jacksonville Electric Authority and staffed by the Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition, the committee is in the process of pledging to be a Workplace Charging Challenge Ambassador, working on behalf of DOE to assist local businesses with WPC adoption.  To learn more about Drive Electric Florida or the Workplace Charging Challenge, please visit the DEF website:  http://driveelectricflorida.org/.

Melbourne-Train-the-Trainer-2Central Florida Clean Cities then kicked off its First Responders Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Safety Training program in Melbourne on April 19.  This was the first of many “train the trainers” sessions, during which local first responder trainers are taught how to conduct workshops with their teams on approaching AFV collisions, particularly for propane, CNG/LNG, and electric vehicles.  This program will continue throughout the year with scheduled trainings pending in Tampa, Ocala, Broward County, and Jacksonville.

On April 20, intern Shauna Basques spoke on her year’s work with the Central Florida Clean Cities Coalition in the Clean Cities University Workforce Development Program’s end of semester presentation.  Busy staffing the Drive Electric Florida Workplace Charging Committee and assisting Coordinator Colleen Kettles with program projects and events, Shauna continued her work throughout the summer, advancing alternative fuel vehicle adoption.

2016-NASA_KSC-Earth-Day-EventCentral Florida Clean Cities also partnered with the Florida Solar Energy Center to present on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and alternative fuel vehicle solutions at the Kennedy Space Center/NASA’s Earth Day celebration, April 21 – 22.  On the event’s first day, presenters met with KSC/NASA personnel, displaying a Chevy Volt, a Nissan LEAF, and two solar ovens.  On the second day, these displays were moved into the Kennedy Space Center’s Visitor Complex, near the Rocket Garden, where presenters were able to meet with KSC visitors and staff alike, speaking on the benefits of AFVs and alternative energy sources.

EnergyWhiz took over the Florida Solar Energy Center in Cocoa, FL on Saturday, May 14.  Hundreds of students participated in renewable energy events, including a solar car sprint, an energy transfer machine competition, a solar energy cook-off, a display of EVs and the Electrathon.  For more information on the event, please visit http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/education/k-12/energywhiz_olympics/index.htm.

2016-Energy-Whiz-ElectrathonFinally, we attended the US DOE Clean Cities Southeast Regional Meeting in Jacksonville, May 18-20, 2016, where CFCCC Coordinator Colleen Kettles made a presentation on the FAST Act and its EV Corridor implications. On May 24, she traveled to NREL in Golden Colorado for a Clean Cities meeting on advanced technology vehicles and their impact on Clean Cities activities.

Although we’re done with spring, we’ll be reporting back on our summer events soon.  In the meantime, check out the upcoming 2016 EV Transportation and Technology Summit at http://www.EVsummit.org.  Hosted at the Florida Solar Energy Center in Cocoa, FL over October 17-20, the summit will feature presentations and industry panels on electric vehicle transportation planning, policy building, and future technologies designed to promote electric vehicle advancement.  Register now!

Question of the Month: What are the various vehicle weight classes and why do they matter?

April 22, 2016 by Clean Cities

How do I know which Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard applies to my vehicle? What are the state emissions testing requirements for my vehicle? Would a medium-duty vehicle qualify for the plug-in electric drive motor vehicle tax credit? To answer these questions, you must first understand the specifics of the vehicle weight classifications to determine which laws, regulations, and incentives may apply to your vehicle or fleet.

You may recall learning about federal agencies and vehicle classes from our February Question of the Month. However, each agency defines vehicle classes differently. So this month, we will dig deeper into the specific vehicle weight classes set by three federal agencies. This guide will help you identify a Class 1 vehicle to a Heavy-Duty Vehicle 8b, and everything in between.

U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)

imageThe FHWA defines vehicles as Class 1 through 8, the most common categorization used in the fleet industry. The classes are based on a vehicle’s gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR), which is the maximum operating weight of the vehicle, measured in pounds (lbs.). GVWR is set by the manufacturer and includes the total vehicle weight plus fluids, passengers, and cargo. The FHWA’s vehicle classes (listed below) are used in the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act (e.g., as it relates to the National Highway Freight Program). The vehicle classes are also used by certain states to determine vehicle road and fuel taxes, access to roadways, and idle reduction and emissions reduction requirements.

  • Light-Duty Vehicle: less than (<) 10,000 lbs.
    • Class 1: <6,000 lbs.
      • Example vehicle: Sedan or sport-utility vehicle (SUV)
    • Class 2: 6,001 – 10,000 lbs.
      • Example vehicle: Utility van
  • Medium-Duty Vehicle: 10,001 – 26,000 lbs.
    • Class 3: 10,001 – 14,000 lbs.
      • Example vehicle: Mini bus
    • Class 4: 14,001 – 16,000 lbs.
      • Example vehicle: Step van
    • Class 5: 16,001 – 19,500 lbs.
      • Example vehicle: Bucket truck
    • Class 6: 19,501 – 26,000 lbs.
      • Example vehicle: School bus
  • Heavy-Duty Vehicle: greater than (>) 26,000 lbs.
    • Class 7: 26,001 – 33,000 lbs.
      • Example vehicle: City transit bus
    • Class 8: >33,000 lbs.
      • Example vehicle: Refuse truck

For more vehicle examples, see the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) Types of Vehicles by Weight Class chart.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

The EPA uses the following categories to certify vehicles based on emissions standards, in conjunction with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s CAFE standards to regulate fuel economy. The light-duty vehicle category is also used in the Energy Policy Act vehicle aquisition requirements. Note that there is a distinction between vehicles and engines in the EPA’s classification because there are separate emissions standards for each.

Passenger Vehicles

  • Light-Duty Vehicle: <8,500 lbs.
  • Medium-Duty Vehicle: 8,501 – 10,000 lbs.

Heavy-Duty Vehicles and Engines

  • General Trucks:
    • Light-Duty Trucks: <8,500 lbs.
    • Heavy-Duty Vehicle Heavy-Duty Engine: >8,500 lbs.
  • Heavy-Duty Trucks:
    • Light-Duty Truck 1 and 2: <6,000 lbs.
      • Split is based on loaded vehicle weight (LVW), where:
        • Light-Duty Truck 1: <3,750 lbs. LVW
        • Light-Duty Truck 2: 3,751 – 6,000 lbs. LVW
    • Light-Duty Truck 3 and 4: 6,001 – 8,500 lbs.
      • Split is based on adjusted loaded vehicle weight (ALVW, the average of the GVWR and the curb weight, which is the weight of the vehicle without passengers or cargo), where:
        • Light-Duty Truck 3: <5,750 lbs. ALVW
        • Light-Duty Truck 4: >5,750 lbs. adjusted ALVW
    • Heavy-Duty Vehicle 2b: 8,501 – 10,000 lbs.
    • Heavy-Duty Vehicle 3: 10,001 – 14,000 lbs.
    • Heavy-Duty Vehicle 4: 14,001 – 16,000 lbs.
    • Heavy-Duty Vehicle 5: 16,001 – 19,500 lbs.
    • Heavy-Duty Vehicle 6: 19,501 – 26,000 lbs.
    • Heavy-Duty Vehicle 7: 26,001 – 33,000 lbs.
    • Heavy-Duty Vehicle 8a: 33,001 – 60,000 lbs.
    • Heavy-Duty Vehicle 8b: >60,000 lbs.
  • Heavy-Duty Engines:
    • Light Light-Duty Truck: <6,000 lbs.
    • Heavy Light-Duty Truck: 6,001 – 8,500 lbs.
    • Light Heavy-Duty Engine: 8,501 – 19,500 lbs.
    • Medium Heavy-Duty Engine: 19,501 – 33,000 lbs.
    • Heavy Heavy-Duty Engine Urban Bus: >33,000 lbs.

U.S. Census Bureau

The U.S. Census Bureau uses the following Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey classes to measure how many private and commercial trucks operate within the United States.

  • Light-Duty Vehicle: <10,000 lbs.
  • Medium-Duty Vehicle: 10,000 – 19,500 lbs.
  • Light Heavy-Duty Vehicle: 19,001 – 26,000 lbs.
  • Heavy-Duty Vehicle: >26,000 lbs.

Looking for a more visual comparison of the various classifications? Check out the AFDC Vehicle Weight Classes and Categories chart.

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team
technicalresponse@icfi.com
800-254-6735

Showcasing National Leadership, Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer Joins Seven Other Mayors to Launch Energy Secure Cities Coalition and Highlight the City’s Transition of its Municipal Fleet to Alternative Fuel Vehicles

March 3, 2016 by Clean Cities

Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer joins coalition seeking to retire 50,000 petroleum-powered vehicles, saving tens of millions in taxpayer dollars and improving U.S. national and economic security.

ORLANDO, FL – Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer joined seven other mayors Thursday in launching the Energy Secure Cities Coalition (ESCC), a group of cities dedicated to transitioning their municipal fleets from petroleum-fueled vehicles to vehicles powered by alternative fuels, like electricity and natural gas.

The City of Orlando has been migrating its fleet to advanced fuel vehicles since 2010 as part of its efforts to be one of the most sustainable cities in the country.  Moving toward the use of advanced fuels benefits both Orlando residents and the environment by reducing the dependence on and use of more expensive fuels, reducing carbon dioxide emissions and saving taxpayers money by reducing fuel and maintenance costs.

“The City of Orlando is committed to taking the steps necessary to preserve our natural resources for our children and future generations to come,” said Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer.  “That’s why we pledged to run City fleet vehicles on 100 percent renewable resources by 2030 as part of our Green Works Orlando sustainability initiative and we are proud to join with other cities in this effort as part of the national Energy Secure Cities Coalition.”

The City of Orlando boasts 1,689 advanced fuel vehicles currently in its fleet and plans to grow this number to a total of 2,389 by 2030.  This year alone, the City of Orlando will deploy a total of 72 new advanced fuel vehicles including 29 CNG and hydraulic-hybrid trucks, 25 Via Motors Plug-in Hybrid-Electric Vehicles (PHEV) and 18 hybrid vehicles.  The City’s first CNG fueling station also began operation this year.

By joining the Energy Secure Cities Coalition, Orlando joins a network of cities that will share best practices and learn from each other before, during and after the fleet conversion process.  In addition to Orlando, the Energy Secure Cities Coalition includes:

  • Atlanta, Ga.
  • Charlotte, N.C.
  • Indianapolis, Ind.
  • Rochester, N.Y.
  • Sacramento Calif.
  • San Diego, Calif.
  • West Palm Beach, Fla.

“With 92 percent of our transportation sector powered by a single fuel—oil—our local economies are dangerously exposed to a volatile, unpredictable global oil market,” said SAFE President and CEO Robbie Diamond. “Cities are America’s centers for innovation, and it is absolutely essential we put that talent to good use protecting us from oil supply disruptions and economically devastating price spikes. And the more we do here at home to lessen our reliance on oil, the more we help our soldiers abroad, who are all too often forced to intervene to protect supply infrastructure in unstable parts of the world.”

Together, the Energy Secure Cities Coalition will grow to 25 cities by 2025 with the goal of taking 50,000 petroleum-powered vehicles off the road, saving 500,000 barrels of oil every year and protecting city budgets from volatile and unpredictable global oil prices.

The ESCC is a project of its member cities in collaboration with Securing America’s Future Energy and the Electrification Coalition. Learn more at www.energysecurecities.org.

###

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Cassandra Lafser, City of Orlando Press Secretary, Cassandra.Lafser@CityofOrlando.net, 407.246.2182

​​​​​Ellen Carey, Securing America’s Future Energy Vice President of Communications, ​​​​​​​ecarey@secureenergy.org​​​​, 202.461.2382

Heather Fagan

Deputy Chief of Staff
City of Orlando, Office of the Mayor
400 S. Orange Ave, 3rd Floor
Orlando, FL 32802

Tax Extenders Legislation Clears Congress: Key Tax Credits Reinstated Through 2014

December 18, 2014 by Clean Cities

IMG_4856-0.JPG

On Tuesday night, December 16, the Senate approved legislation sent from the House that extends the life of a number of tax breaks through tax year 2014. Included in the package are a number of credits important to fleets, of which are outlined below.

Alternative Fuel Excise Tax Credit – $.50 per gallon alternative fuel tax credit for compressed natural gas and propane when used as a vehicle fuel.
Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit – Qualified biodiesel producers or blenders are eligible for an income tax credit of $1.00 per gallon of pure biodiesel or renewable diesel produced or used in the blending process.
Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit – A 30 percent credit for installing vehicle refueling property for alternative fuel, such as pumps for ethanol or liquefied natural gas.
Bonus Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS), commonly referred to as Bonus Depreciation – allows extra depreciation to be taken for 50 percent of a truck’s purchase price, with an extra bonus depreciation deduction of up to $8,000 for automobiles, light trucks, vans, and SUVs.
President Obama is expected to sign the tax extenders legislation within days. As mentioned, the measure is only applicable to the 2014 tax year, which means the credits will not be renewed for tax year 2015 unless the new Congress takes the matter up again.

NAFA Fleet Management Association | 125 Village Boulevard, Suite 200 | Princeton, NJ 08540
609.720.0882 | info@nafa.org | www.nafa.org

U.S. House Extends Alternative-Fuel Tax Credits

December 9, 2014 by Clean Cities

The U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday voted to approve H.R. 5771, the Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014, which includes an amendment extending the federal 50-cent per gallon alternative fuels excise tax credits through the remainder of 2014, even though the credits had previously expired at the end of 2013.

These tax credits were made available to individuals, businesses, and other entities that use transportation fuel products such as compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), and propane autogas.

The alternative fuels excise tax credits are part of many business, individual, and energy tax incentives covered in H.R. 5771, which will next be reviewed by the Senate.

From Green Fleet Magazine

Should you charge customers for EV charging stations?

November 20, 2014 by Clean Cities

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Courtesy of Oregon Department of Transportation

Is it a prohibited gift of public funds if the agency allows public employees and members of the public to charge their personal vehicle at an agency charging station without imposing a fee?

Can employees be provided with free charging as an employee benefit?
Should an agency require that employees enter into an employee agreement for use of the EV charging stations?

The gift of public funds consideration seems to be the biggest legal concern among government agencies, and there are two ways to analyze the issue. As a reminder, the gift of public funds prohibition in the Washington State Constitution (article 8, section 7) is mandatory and must be strictly observed. It prohibits a local government from giving “any money, or property, or loan[ing] its money, or credit to or in aid of any individual, association, company or corporation, except for the necessary support of the poor and infirm.”

The threshold question under the gift of public funds analysis is whether providing EV charging for personal vehicles is a “fundamental governmental purpose?” If yes, no gift of public funds occurs. If no, then the question turns to whether there is consideration and donative intent.

Federal PEV Credit Phase-Out Summary

October 30, 2014 by Clean Cities

CC logo-Round-Outline

How does the federal plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) tax credit phase-out work, and has it begun for any vehicle manufacturers? What is the status of other federal alternative fuel tax credits?

Florida Expands Natural Gas Fueling-Station Network

October 7, 2014 by Clean Cities

IMG_3591.JPGRich Clement/Bloomberg News

Since Florida passed a natural gas-vehicle rebate program, the amount of fueling stations have increased by more than 200%, according to the Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition.

Since 2012, when the state passed the Natural Fuel Gas Vehicle Rebate program, Florida has added 43 compressed natural gas fueling stations with an additional 29 planned, according to the coalition. Currently, there are 61 active CNG stations.

“The fleets in my legislative district, Jacksonville, and its surrounding area have begun the transition to the clean burning American natural gas,” state Rep. Lake Ray said in a statement

Governors Ask for Higher Biodiesel, Ethanol Mandates

October 3, 2014 by Clean Cities

A group representing 33 state governors asked the administration to increase the blending mandates for biodiesel and a certain kind of ethanol.

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn (D) and Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad (R), the leaders of the Governors’ Biofuels Coalition, said potential decreases in the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) volumes for biodiesel and cellulosic ethanol could hurt the nascent waste biofuel industry.

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