News

 

 

 

Follow me on LinkedIn follow me on facebook tweet me
get in touch

Fuels Fix Fall 2014 Edition

October 30, 2014 by Clean Cities

 

Fuels Fix Fall 2014 Edition

Fuels Fix Fall 2014 Edition

Inside the Fall 2014 edition of the Fix:

  • Carolina Blue Skies Initiative expands Asheville’s Alt Fuel Use

  • Alabama Says, “It Starts with Us!”

  • Oregon Celebrates First DC Fast Charger at Mt. Hood

  • Plus much more!

CNG Infrastructure & Report Webinar

September 10, 2014 by Clean Cities

IMG_2810.JPG
IMG_2813.JPG

When
Thursday, September 16th
3pm ET to 4:30pm ET.

Do you want to learn more about how much a compressed natural gas fueling station costs?

Clean Cities has been working closely with the CNG industry to create a report on the Costs Associated with CNG Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure (PDF file). This document provides an overview of the components of a station, factors that can affect the cost, and ballpark cost ranges. Look for the release of this document in early September.

Also, save the date for a Clean Cities CNG Infrastructure webinar on September 16th from 3-4:30pm ET. Mark Smith from the US Department of Energy and John Gonzales from the National Renewable Energy Lab will present an overview of the key components of a CNG station, how a CNG station works, and factors that affect the cost. Jeremy Talbot from Phoenix Energy will describe the design and costs of a CNG station on the smaller end of the design range. Graham Barker from ANGI Energy Systems will describe the design and costs of a larger CNG station example. During this webinar, participants will have the opportunity to ask questions about the presentations as well as the content of the related CNG infrastructure document.

This webinar is open to the general public, especially those considering CNG, and no pre-registration is required.

Where
URL:
https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join/
Conference number: PW8410847
Audience passcode: 3693493

Participants can join the event directly at:
https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PW8410847&p=3693493&t=c

Audio
888-807-9760
Participant passcode: 3693493

We recommend using Google Chrome or Firefox to access the webinar. Please be sure to visit this link in advance of the webinar, https://www.mymeetings.com/global/en/mslm_download.php, to make sure all the necessary plug-ins are installed so that your computer can access the webinar software properly.

New Battery Design Could Help Solar and Wind Power the Grid

April 30, 2013 by Clean Cities

Researchers from the Energy Department’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have designed a low-cost, long-life “flow” battery that could enable solar and wind energy to become major suppliers to the electrical grid. The research is a product of the new Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR), an Energy Department Energy Innovation Hub.  Led by Argonne National Laboratory with SLAC as a major partner, JCESR is one of five such Hubs created by the Energy Department to accelerate energy research. It was established last November.

While solar and wind make a substantial contribution to the nation’s energy supply, they also create significant power fluctuations, which can sometimes exceed the tolerances of the electrical grid. “Flow” batteries can smooth those fluctuations. The new flow battery uses a simplified, less expensive design than other batteries, which may improve its scalability and cost-effectiveness. In laboratory tests, it also demonstrated excellent energy storage performance through the equivalent of more than five and a half years of daily charge and discharge cycles.  See the Energy Department press release and the JCESR website.

Energy Department Announces New Innovative Projects to Develop Advanced Drop-in Biofuels for Military Jets and Ships

April 22, 2013 by Clean Cities

As part of the Obama Administration’s all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department today announced nearly $18 million in four innovative pilot-scale biorefineries in California, Iowa, and Washington that will test renewable biofuels as a domestic alternative to power our cars, trucks, and planes that meet military specifications for jet fuel and shipboard diesel. These projects build on the Obama Administration’s broader efforts to advance biofuels technologies to continue to bring down costs, improve performance, and identify effective, non-food feedstocks and processing techniques.

National Parks Move Transportation Forward in Great Outdoors

April 3, 2013 by Clean Cities

America’s National Parks have always attracted pioneers in transportation. In the early 1900s, the new transcontinental railroad encouraged people to “See America First,” particularly the National Parks. Today, the National Park Service is leading by example. Working in partnership with the Energy Department’s Clean Cities National Parks Initiative, National Parks across the country are using alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies to reduce air pollution and lower fuel costs.

Building on the success of its existing National Park Service projects, Clean Cities is now partnering with five additional parks to implement specific projects that improve the parks’ environment and increase the sustainability of their operations. Most of the projects focus on shifting many of the parks’ vehicles to run on alternative fuels, such as propane, biodiesel and electricity—a transition that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve air quality, and minimize fuel costs.

The projects will also educate park visitors on improving the sustainability of their own driving habits to reduce greenhouse gas emissions during park visits and when they return home. For example, parks such as Yellowstone and Grand Teton are educating visitors on the benefits of reducing the amount of time they idle their cars or visiting sites in the parks by biking, walking, or using park shuttles. If just 25% of visitors at the 13 parks in the Clean Cities National Parks Initiative reduce their idling by five minutes, it would save 192,000 gallons of gasoline and more than 2,000 tons of greenhouse gas emissions each year. For the complete story, see the Energy Blog.

back to top