Follow me on LinkedIn follow me on facebook tweet me
get in touch

Georgia Power Incentivises Consumers and Fleets with $12M EV Pilot

November 14, 2014 by Clean Cities
Tesla and Charger

Photo: Byron Small

The utility will invest $12 million in a pilot program that will boost the number of electric vehicle chargers in Georgia. One of out about every 60 new cars registered in the Peach State, in the first six months, was an all-electric vehicle, according to IHS Automotive.

About 1,000 new plug-in vehicles (which include all-electric vehicles, such as the Nissan LEAF) are registered in Georgia every month, according to Don Francis, executive director of Clean Cities-Georgia. Eighty percent of those cars are registered in metro Atlanta.

Atlanta is the No. 2 market nationwide for electric and plug-in hybrids and the No. 1 market for the Nissan LEAF, Georgia Power spokeswoman Amy Fink said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Which Electric-Car Makers in the U.S. Are Serious? Sales Show Top Three

November 10, 2014 by Clean Cities

 

BMW i3 vs. Chevy Volt

photo: David Noland, Tom Moloughney

Green Car Reports grouped the cars by maker so that, for instance, General Motors includes both Chevrolet and Cadillac plug-in sales.

And they included compliance cars; even if they’re limited in volume, they do have plugs.

Here are the percentages of a carmaker’s total U.S. sales this year that are made up of battery-electric, range-extended electric, and plug-in hybrid sales:

  • Tesla: 100 percent
  • BMW: 2.3 percent (4,534 of 201,000)
  • Nissan: 2.1 percent (24,411 of 1.17 million)
  • Ford: 0.9 percent (18,859 of 2.07 million)
  • GM: 0.7 percent (17,969 of 2.43 million)
  • Toyota: 0.6 percent (12,321 of 1.98 million)

Surprised?

A couple of things stand out.

 

 

 

Tesla’s Battery Gigafactory May Achieve Nirvana: $100 Per Kilowatt-Hour, Report Says

August 30, 2014 by Clean Cities

IMG_2581.JPGIzmo, Inc.

Many within the electric car industry believe that $100 per kilowatt-hour will be the tipping point for electric-car batteries.

It is the point at which electric vehicles will be able to compete directly with internal combustion vehicles on price, and therefore a major step in boosting sales.

According to investment pundits at The Motley Fool (via Charged EVs), the Tesla Motors battery gigafactory could achieve that $100-per-kWh battery cost.

That’s because it could overachieve on its stated goal of cutting 30 percent from today’s battery costs.

We already know that Tesla’s gigafactory will be huge.

The company’s initial projected figures put the plant at between 500 and 1,000 acres, and once up to full capacity it is expected to employ 6,500 people.

By 2020, at its peak, it’s slated to produce 35 gigawatt-hours per year of battery cells, and 50 GWh per year of battery packs–enough to supply Tesla’s projections for half a million electric vehicles a year in 2020.

back to top